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Trad plans to lock up Cape York Peninsula if the ALP wins election

Green preferences are driving the Labor Government’s proposed draconian environmental policies as a trade-off for the Adani coal mine approval.

A source close to the ALP is warning Wild Rivers “on steroids” rebadged as ‘Pristine Rivers’ will be put back on the table along with revamped, tough vegetation management laws should the ALP win the upcoming election.

The source said revisiting Wild Rivers and vegetation management laws are on the agenda for the upcoming State ALP conference to be held in Townsville at the Convention Centre on July 28 and 29.

Spot the clowns: Miles and Trad want to lock up Cape York in exchange for allowing Adani mine to go ahead

A World Heritage listing over the Laura sandstone escarpment country, mooted by the State Government, also looms large for the people of the Peninsula.

Deputy Premier Jackie Trad is moving to pacify the Greens’ hostility over approvals to allow Australia’s largest coal mine in Central Queensland to go ahead.

Trad and her colleague, Environment and Heritage Protection Minister Stephen Miles, have not yet taken into consideration the strident opposition of Cape York Peninsula communities, the Cape York Land Council and pastoralists alike, some of whom claim they will campaign against the party at the State election expected on November 4 this year.

Pastoralists and some communities believe a World Heritage nomination by the State Government will be the precursor for listing the entire Peninsula, in effect the beginning of the end for the economic prosperity of Aboriginal communities sitting on vast tracts of grazing property.

Cape York land Council chairman Richie Ah Mat has come out swinging against Trad and Miles secret plans to reintroduce Wild Rivers on steroids

In a recent radio interview, Chairman of the CYLC, Richie AhMat castigated the proposed new versions of Wild Rivers and vegetation laws as well as the existing environmental overlays on most Aboriginal freehold and Deed of Grant in Trust land(DOGIT) covering nearly one half of the land area of the Peninsula.

Referring to the Wild Rivers legislation, Mr AhMat asked how the government expected Aboriginal people to start up businesses and to be economically viable “when these land restrictions appear out of nowhere?”

“You can’t talk about economic development on one hand and you can’t talk about indigenous employment on the other, and you can’t talk about Northern Australia on both hands.”

In reply to a question about the as yet undisclosed ‘Pristine Rivers’ policy Mr AhMat alluded to funding that had been allocated in the past two state budgets purportedly for consultation with traditional owners.

He said he was worried about all the rivers in Cape York which could be affected by a lock up policy.

“All of our rivers in Cape York are fresh water rivers, water is a huge commodity now and nobody in their wildest dreams 10 years or fifteen years ago expected them to buy a bottle of fresh water,” Mr Ah Mat said.

“To buy a bottle of fresh water is more than a litre of fuel.

“Why does the government want to lock up Cape York, because they have a 20 to 30 year plan but they aren’t talking to anybody, it’s all secretive because we are out of sight and out of mind.

“We fought long and hard against the wild rivers, long and hard and we were untied as one on Cape York.

“This Pristine Rivers believe me there are rumblings about it in 1 William Street (Executive Building) now.

“This legislation over land is going to block everything.”

Gordon Rasmussen, Katters Australian Party candidate for the Cook electorate, which takes in all of Cape York, agreed with Mr Ah Mat.

“It looks like Northern Development is just a talk fest because what Mr Ah Mat says about locking up all the rivers and land on Cape York makes a mockery of the $5 billion federal fund for northern land development,” Mr Rasmussen pointed out.

“How does the federal government expect to achieve anything in an area like the Peninsula to help economic development for struggling communities when the State Government has divided up most of the Aboriginal land into nature reserves, national parks and heritage areas?

“If the Labor Party gets back into government we are all in for a very rough trot.”

Nearly 70 per cent of Cape York covered by nature reserves or national parks; little left for Aboriginal economic benefit

Aboriginal people of Cape York Peninsula are being duped and dudded by the State Government over large land ‘hand overs’ that the local communities believe will prevent them from earning income.

On April 7, another 54,000 hectares north of Cooktown was handed over to several tribal groups from Hopevale, adding even more locked-up land to the vast national park estate on Cape York.

Since the CYPLUS (Cape York Peninsula Land Use Study) research of the 80’s and early 90’s once productive grazing land has steadily been resumed by State Governments, mainly the ALP, to be gazetted as national park or some type of nature reserve.

Nature reserves, national parks, regional parks, timber reserves and DOGIT land shaded areas cover at least 70 per cent of the Peninsula leaving small areas for grazing or commercial purposes that are not of any economic benefit to Aboriginal groups

Various Aboriginal corporations gratefully sign up to vast areas of former cattle stations, such as the Olkola people when last year they were handed five, once viable large cattle properties in central Cape York Peninsula totalling 1.5 million acres that used to run 30,000 cattle.

The Prescribed Body Corporate gleefully accepted the gift from the State Government, but seemingly did not properly read the paperwork. The PBC just helped the National Parks and Wildlife Service add another one million acres to their vast estate, on which no cattle grazing is allowed.

The remaining portion of Aboriginal Freehold can be used for grazing or selective timber cutting, but under the ALP environmental laws would have to be excluded from the nature reserves and park area by fencing it off.

The fencing would cost several million dollars and require maintenance on a weekly basis to be effective.

Indigenous leader Noel Pearson angrily said, “…again Aborigines have been duped by the Labor/Green bureaucracy.”

Noel Pearson sick and tired of being ‘dudded’ by the Labor/Green bureaucracy

Pearson heaped vitriol on the Labor and former LNP governments at a large meeting of stakeholders in Mareeba recently for dudding the communities of Cape York over land use.

“We have no property rights on Cape York and we need upgraded tenure. There are lots of fronts where all landowners are vulnerable,” he said.

Public servants who once worked for environmental lobby groups were targeted by Pearson for pushing extreme green agendas within government.

“These greens have infiltrated indigenous groups and government departments and it’s like a tag team, they are all the same, and have networked with all departments,” Mr Pearson said.

“Public servants should declare their association with environmental groups.

“The proposition there is going to be land clearing the size of Victoria, is fantasy.

“There are only pockets of land suitable for development.

“White people too have had many generations on this land and they have a great love for their land. It’s high time the law in Queensland started to respect that relationship.

“We spent five hard years and lots of money fighting Wild Rivers in court but we could have been doing other more productive things.

“We need another 10 independents in parliament to put us in a better position, given the absence of an Upper House.”

Members vow to vote down any changes to Qld vegetation laws moved by Labor

“We do not want a return to the nasty era of tree police”

     KAP member for Dalrymple Shane Knuth

An emotionally-charged meeting of Far Northern pastoralists, indigenous representatives, councils and farmers at Mareeba has urged three State Parliamentary crossbenchers to vote down proposed changes to the Vegetation Management Act.

Deputy Premier Jackie Trad, in a move to appease Brisbane environmentalists and bolster Greens Party preference support for the ALP, will introduce new VMA regulations to halt tree clearing in State Parliament this week.

Agforce hosted the gathering of nearly 80 primary producers and industry representatives from Innisfail to Cape York Peninsula, held at Mareeba Bowls Club on Tuesday.

In spite of the threat of a snap election, crossbenchers Rob Katter and Shane Knuth vowed they would vote against the new regulations that Mr Knuth said would set the state back 20 years.

Agforce Tablelands organiser Graham Elmes, Robbie Katter, Shane Knuth and Billy Gordon

“We have been telling the Premier for a long time that landowners cannot afford and will not support the return to the nasty era of tree police,” Mr Knuth said.

“We have just had one of the worst droughts in history with record numbers of bank foreclosures and the Labor Party wants to make farmers suffer even more.

“We will not support the new laws.”

After the meeting Mr Knuth said he did not know which way Member for Cairns, now independent Rob Pyne would vote after he deserted the Labor Party last week.

While addressing the audience, Member for Cook Billy Gordon tacitly approved the stance of his crossbench colleagues.

Agforce General President Grant Maudsley said the State Government’s own data showed tree coverage in Queensland increased by 437,000 hectares between 2012 – 2014.

“Moves by the government to reject simple data and repeal the current vegetation management laws are the biggest threat to Queensland farmers since the Gillard Government smashed the live cattle export trade in 2011,” Mr Maudsley told the meeting.

“The results for consumers will be more expensive fresh produce and a loss of jobs. Meat processors have already started putting off staff because of a slow-down in domestic cattle supply as the national herd hits a 20 year low.”

Mareeba District Fruit and Vegetable Growers representative Makse Srhoj warned the new laws would impact severely on farms within the MDIA because of their smaller size.

“If we have to leave 30 per cent remnant vegetation on a block then we can’t do anything with them, particularly if there are two or more deeds,” Mr Srhoj said.

“Who looks after the land the best? Farmers; we are the real greenies.”

Noel Pearson says even white people have land rights

Noel Peason

Noel Pearson

A member of the panel, indigenous leader Noel Pearson, waded in roundly condemning green groups and the ALP Government for holding back economic opportunities in northern communities, rejecting the new laws as a ‘rebirth’ of Wild Rivers legislation.

In his hallmark immutable style Pearson did not hold back, criticising Federal Member for Leichardt Warren Entsch and former Member for Cook, David Kempton for waging a “disgraceful campaign against Billy Gordon” after he was elected.

“These guys are ‘false prophets,’” Mr Pearson told an entirely attentive audience.

“We have no property rights on Cape York and we need upgraded tenure. There are lots of fronts where all landowners are vulnerable.”

Public servants who once worked for environmental lobby groups were targeted by Pearson for pushing extreme green agendas within government.

“These greens have infiltrated indigenous groups and government departments and it’s like a tag team, they are all the same, and have networked with all departments,” Mr Pearson said.

“Public servants should declare their association with environmental groups.

“The proposition there is going to be land clearing the size of Victoria, is fantasy.

“There are only pockets of land suitable for development.

“White people too have had many generations on this land and they have a great love for their land. It’s high time the law in Queensland started to respect that relationship.

“We spent five hard years and lots of money fighting Wild Rivers in court but we could have been doing other more productive things.

“We need another 10 independents in parliament to put us in a better position, given the absence of an Upper House.”

Fishermen call for immediate FNQ crocodile cull before more people are taken

Far North Queensland inhabitants have long called for a crocodile cull before any more lives are taken. The federal Member for Kennedy Bob Katter, an advocate of salt water crocodile culling said that their numbers had reached unprecedented, epidemic levels.

It has become unsafe for Cape York’s 5000 Aborigines to enter any water for fishing or swimming. In the Torres Strait many inhabitants regularly dive along the coastline capturing lobsters, turtle and dugong.

They have reported a large increase in crocodile numbers at their favourite diving locations and are waiting helplessly for an attack to occur.

In the Bloomfield River 100 klm north of Cairns fishermen report that it is impossible to set any crab pots because the large number of crocs destroy them within hours.

One fisherman, ‘Gobbler’ said he had recently returned from a Bloomfield River fishing trip but was “really worried about the large crocs that now follow boats.”

He said boat ramps too are dangerous for fishermen because the crocs lie in waiting for a boat to be launched.

“One large croc followed my boat for a long way when I was checking the pots and any wrong move with the boat could be fatal because they are not afraid of people,” Gobbler said.

“One is five metres long and aggressive, another is 4m, and two others we saw are 3.5m long, and all are potential man-eaters and all were close to Bloomfield (settlement).

“There are far too many and there should be a cull throughout the north right now before there are more people killed.”

The folly of very expensive croc relocation

It took 400 kilometres and just under a month for a Queensland research team to realise that relocating far north Queensland problem crocodiles was never going to be an option.

Several years ago UQ School of Biological Sciences Professor Craig Franklin and his team translocated three saltwater crocodiles from a remote section of Wenlock River in the Steve Irwin Wildlife Reserve on the west coast of Cape York to various remote locations along the west coast.

Tiny Tim, a male crocodile involved in Professor Franklin’s latest research, detected on Thursday, September 10, 2015, north of Weipa. Photo: Supplied

The aim was to to track their movements and determine if relocation would be a good management strategy for crocodiles who continuously come into contact with humans or livestock.

Two of the crocodiles were released up to 80 kilometres away, along the west coast of Cape York, with one carried via helicopter 400 kilometres to a remote beach on the east coast of Cape York.

This crocodile, which weighed about 350 kilograms and measured 4.5 metres, shocked Professor Franklin’s team at the time by swimming over 400 kilometres around the tip of Cape York in less than 20 days to return home.

A relocated 350kg crocodile swam 400km to get home. Photo: Terry Trewin

This feat not only destroyed any notion of relocating problem crocodiles found in far north Queensland, it also proved, for the first time, that crocodiles use currents to travel long distances, Professor Franklin said.

“When we translocated it from the west coast of Cape York to the East Coast, it didn’t go straight back home, it waited around for several months,” he said.

“It was the first time anyone had shown that crocodiles use currents to travel.

“If they are travelling long distances in river systems they will use tidal movement in and out of the river to facilitate their travel.”

Unfortunately this has meant other more invasive methods have been put in place to manage problem crocodiles.

“If there is a problem animal likely to impact humans or livestock, then the government’s Department of Environment makes all attempts to try and catch that animal and then place it into a farm or zoo; try to find some place that will take it,” Professor Franklin said.

“If they are unable to capture it, they are able to make the decisions to shoot the animal, but they try not to do that.

“In terms of the population, it makes very little difference whether the animal is moved or shot, because its ability to reproduce (in the wild) has been lost.

Professor Franklin’s team has been tagging and tracking crocodiles ever since in a bid to better understand these apex predators.

Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/relocated-350kg-crocodile-swims-400km-to-return-home-in-north-queensland-20151220-glrzm8.html#ixzz3uuCsY7lW

Australia most over-governed and dearest country in world to live in

VALUABLE ADVICE FOR OUR MANY HUNDREDS OF INTERNATIONAL SUBSCRIBERS

ausflagAustralia, the most over-governed and excessively regulated country on earth may be the most expensive place to live but there are ways to keep your finances in order.

Here politicians from all three levels of government, pride themselves on how much legislation they can introduce in one parliamentary sitting.

Tourists and international business entrepreneurs are starting to steer clear Australia because of the excessive bureaucracy generated by Federal, State and Local Governments.

For example applications to start a mining venture can take more than three years just to get an approval. Try building houses, motels or accommodation units in a city or region and the bureaucracy will add 10 to 20 per cent to the project budget.

Environmental studies and native title take the cake, often adding years and hundreds of expensive, unnecessary and ridiculous conditions to a development application before, or if it is ever granted.

Native title is probably the greatest scam ever perpetuated on planning and land title issue approvals. Miners are not able to start exploration until a misnomer labeled an Indigenous Land Use Agreement is granted by supposed native title holders to the mining company. This can take between three to five years, but in some cases much longer.

Economically depressed and often disadvantaged ‘indigenous’ groups view an ILUA with a mining company as manna from heaven. The negotiations are stretched to the limit. Demands for a large cut of mining revenue or royalties, cultural heritage surveys, employment and housing are but a few of the normal requirements before land access is given.

Noble sentiments one would say, and so a (foreign) mining company should pay but in these days of the commodities depression, an ILUA can often make or break a project.

Employment agreements between indigenous communities and the mining industry usually stipulate that the workforce should comprise a minimum 30 per cent indigenous employees.

But onshore and offshore mining companies have been burnt by employment arrangements many times in the past. Mines always agree to hire a significant proportion of Aborigines, but every day experience shows work contracts, with only a few notable exceptions, fail before they start.

Most Aborigines want a job in a mine and eagerly participate in training programs, but when it comes to work on a daily or weekly roster, experience dictates a significant number of indigenous employees just do not turn up for work.

For those who have mining industry experience they well know when an employee fails to notify management of impending absenteeism, crew capabilities can be adversely affected, resulting in lower production, lower morale and safety issues.

aboriginal-flagThis indigenous cultural malady extends across the nation. For decades indigenous people have received government payments to attend funerals or cultural events in their communities. For most people attending a funeral, one day’s absence is all that is necessary. For some Aborigines it is usually a week, or in some cases they simply don’t return to work at all.

A recent experience with a large road construction project on Cape York Peninsula saw local indigenous employees down tools late one afternoon purportedly to attend a funeral the next day.

Insufficient notice was given to the construction manager to keep other contractors working. Coincidentally the indigenous cultural heritage observers departed on a Thursday afternoon, to give themselves a four day weekend, because the following Monday happened to be a public holiday.

As a consequence the $230 million project stalled because the cultural heritage management agreement forbade any machinery work without a $500 a day indigenous cultural heritage observer being present.

Never mind that in the previous 15 years of roadwork on Cape York Peninsula no cultural heritage observers have ever been required or present.

The lure of the largest road budget in recent history on Cape York, exposed the ‘gimmee gimmee’ cultural cringe of local governing bodies.

Governments of all hues have brought this dilemma upon themselves by pandering to militant indigenous organisations such as land councils and Prescribed Body Corporations.

Sydney and Melbourne rising out of reach

Yes, it’s true and not surprising: according to an annual world consumer price index1 Australia is the most expensive country to live in. These days it’s 12% more expensive than the United States, while India is the cheapest of the 19 countries examined.

A roof over your head is no longer a given in Australia, especially in Sydney, the 5th most expensive city in the world.

House prices at historic highsand almost five times the average household income of residents—are forcing some Sydney families to consider moving elsewhere2.

Melbourne residents live in the 8th most expensive major city with a burgeoning population pushing demand higher. While annually Sydney’s population has been increasing by 80,000 people, 95,000 are settling in Melbourne prompting demographers to predict Melbourne’s population will overtake Sydney’s by 20303.

More than rising property prices

Australians are feeling the pressure from more than just property prices. When it comes to basic goods and services the annual world consumer price index found the cost of living in Australia is more expensive than most other places.

Booking a room

Sydney is the most expensive when it comes to short-term accommodation. A five-star hotel room in Sydney is 232% of the cost of its New York counterpart whereas you’d pay just 72% in Melbourne.

Buying a drink

Two-litres of soft drink in Sydney will cost 51% moreand just 18% more in Melbournethan in the Big Apple. When it comes to beer, Sydney and Melbourne both offer better deals than New York. And as you might expect, Germany—at about half the price—is the place to raise your glass.

Shopping for clothes

You guessed it. Australians pay more than Americans whether it’s buying Adidas runners or a pair of Levi’s jeans. But we pay less than most Europeans for the same items.

Paying your fare

Getting from A to B is no laughing matter in Sydney. Public transport fares are higher than any other city in the world, with taxi fares 15% more expensive than New York’s.

Keeping fit

One thing cheaper in Sydney and Melbourne is gym membership. It’s about half the price of New York’s.

While Aussies’ living costs continue to rise it doesn’t mean building wealth is impossible. But it’s vital to get a handle on your finances by planning ahead and taking the pressure off.

Take the pressure off

If it’s all too much and you’re considering moving away from the big smoke, visit the Numbeo website where a cost of living calculator generates comparisons for everything from a café latte to a three-bedroom apartment.

1 Deutsche Bank, Mapping the World’s Prices 2015, http://pull.db-gmresearch.com/cgi-bin/pull/DocPull/17411-76F9/99524599/DB_RandomWalk_2015-04-14_0900b8c0898020b1.pdf

Dreamtime: a cruel delusion of British anthropologists

Source: The Catalyst, Volume 1, Issue 2. September 1999, pp. 10-12.

Copyright: CairnsNews.org©

by Robert J Lee, investigative journalist

aboriginal-flagAboriginal land claims, native title and land rights are based on a false anthropological premise and are totally fraudulent according to astounding new Australian archaeological discoveries and recent linguistic studies.

The delusion of 40,000 years of dreamtime mantra is the product of untruthful anthropologists.

According to Alfred Cort Haddon, a turn of the century figure revered today as the ‘founding father’ of British anthropology, the aborigines were clearly “pre-Dravidian” people from South India.

In Haddon’s 1909 book, The Races of Man, he asserts that Australia was originally inhabited by Papuans, or Negritoes, who wandered on the extreme south of the continent.

Later, a pre-Dravidian race migrated to Australia and overran the continent, absorbing the sparse aboriginal population.

Thus, said Haddon, the original aborigines were either “driven off, exterminated or even partially assimilated.”

Modern anthropologists have a real problem, should they try to dismiss Haddon’s findings. If they dismiss this work of the oligarchy’s icon of the time, they are also discrediting the man who led the famous 1898 Cambridge Anthropological expedition to the Torres Strait, upon whose findings the High Court heavily relied in the Eddie Mabo case.

Mabo was from Murray Island upon which Haddon and his researchers had concentrated their study.

In the remarkable work, Cape York – The Savage Frontier, Queensland author Rodney Liddell asserts, from studying the Jardine diaries, the original Negritoes were hunted down and wiped out by invading aborigines from India.

The tip of Cape York was one of the major landings used by the invaders who arrived in either canoes or on rafts.

Archaeologists in 1973 decided to look for campsites and other evidence on the Cape, finding fire places and middens. Although unreliable, carbon dating of shells and other organic matter was used.

To the horror of the investigating academics, the best they could come up with was between 600 and 1,100 years of occupation by the aborigines.

This petroglyph found in NSW, of Anubus; is an Egyptian deity, son of Osiris who conducted the dead to judgement

This petroglyph of Anubus, found in NSW,  is an Egyptian deity, son of Osiris who conducted the dead to judgement

These aborigines from India were an extremely violent, savage and cannibalistic race who mercilessly hunted down the smaller Negritoes.

It would be impossible to accurately calculate the number of Negritoes massacred by the aborigines, but based on the evidence it would be fair to say at least 150,000 were wiped out over a long period.

In modern terms this would be classed as genocide.

Read the rest of this entry

ABC Rural Radio jaded by ideology

by Robert J Lee

Well you have gotta hand it to Charlie, ABC Radio’s indefatigable rural reporter for the Far North. She covers a multitude of mundane, populist issues some of which really don’t affect the bush or primary industries.

Once a Liberal Party candidate for the federal seat of Leichardt, which takes in Cape York Peninsula and northern Cairns, Charlie McKillop could one day reach the soaring heights of her namesake, the Catholic Saint, Mary MacKillop.

Providing she learns how to think out of the square.

charlie-mckillop-abc

Charlie McKillop

Never one to let a good story get in the way of political ideology, Charlie was remarkably noticeable by her absence on the Atherton Tablelands in the aftermath of the panama disease outbreak that could have decimated the entire banana industry.

The Australian Banana Growers Association was caught napping when word got out about the Panama outbreak at Mareeba that was later proven to be a false test by Bio-security.

But the quarantine procedures hastily stuck together by government and industry still apply and have cost growers dearly.

During the false outbreak Charlie dutifully reported every nuance of the government departments and the ABGA.

Professors of plant life, agronomists and farmers unilaterally agreed once a farm was infected with the doomsday fungus, it was curtains, all over, finito.

Then ABGA joined the chorus assuring farmers and the public that Armageddon had arrived on the Tablelands.

Then a quietly spoken soil nutritionist from the Kingaroy area contacted Katters Australian Party with the news that Panama disease was not an atomic bomb for bananas.

The KAP, fortunately had some rather experienced farmers in their ranks who had heard of the peanut grower, John Koehler from the South Burnett who 25 years ago had managed to produce exceptional dryland peanuts without any measurable occurrence of aflatoxin, caused by a fungal disease that is quite toxic if consumed.

Koehler had transformed previously unusable and ‘flogged out’ peanut paddocks into viable growing areas once again with the diligent application of minerals that were either non-existent or long-missing from most Australian soils.

News reports from the Sunshine Coast district recently carried a similar story about the ailing ginger industry that has been flayed with disease leaving most traditional growing country unusable due to a virile fungus.

Koehler and an agronomist colleague had reversed the ginger fungus problem in trial plots and increased yield by up to 1000 per cent.

The Tableland party organised a seminar at Mareeba for Mr Koehler to assist banana growers in rejuvenating their paddocks by applying the correct minerals in a balanced formula.

Local newspapers and radio stations carried different stories and were excited that “Panama is not a death sentence” as one headline declared.

This was big news in the north, that the $700 million industry could be saved.

Unfortunately Charlie and her Townsville counterpart Craig Zonka were missing in action. The ABC let down its country listeners by denying them some hope of preventing the disease to strike.

Charlie’s Liberal ideology stopped her from reporting on this proven solution for hundreds of desperate farmers.

Not to be outdone, KAP on August 31, hosted a meeting of 300 desperate and dispossessed cattle producers at Charters Towers. Smack bang in the middle of the ABC’s largest rural audience.

ABC Television News from Brisbane turned up at the Towers meeting, giving it state-wide coverage in the nightly news.

Charlie was not going to give any credit to the KAP or Bob Katter for organising such an important meeting(Cairns News Sept 3) while her ‘champions of the bush’ the Liberals tossed many hundreds of family farmers onto the scrap heap.

The meeting heard from Facebook sensation Charlie Phillott who forced the ANZ Bank to return his Winton cattle property, amid a blaze of publicity on 60 Minutes.

It seems the bank had been caught out by Katter and Phillott engaging in unlawful, asset stripping activities.

One resolution, passed unanimously, condemned the Liberal National Party’s so-called drought aid assistance package as “bullshit” and an “unwanted loan at higher than normal bank interest rates.”

Not much of a story, Charlie must have reckoned, but the three television stations and various other news services who turned up thought it was a tremendous show of force by farmers who spoke of their battle with banks and their terrorist receivers, such as Korda Mentha, locally known as the Greek mafia.

Well indeed, Charlie has missed the boat, instead reporting on humdrum issues and flogging the United Nations policy-driven Natural Resource Management group and largely meaningless and costly Landcare programs.

This jaded reporting by the ABC is its hallmark, and if you are not a blackfella, Muslim, a gay or member of the Greens, ALP or LNP, or some defrocked climate change dodo, then any important message won’t ever hit the public broadcaster’s rural airwaves.

Cairns News should say that Cairns ABC regional radio with breakfast programs such as that hosted by airwaves icon Kier Shorey are of the highest quality and perform an informative public service.

The real Noel Pearson that makes one shudder

A combined taskforce of investigators is looking at Noel and Gerhart Pearson through a microscope and will be publishing their findings, allowing all Australians access to information exposing Noel Pearson’s stand-over tactics and blatant racial abuse against whites. His  consistent use of  disgusting foul language and manipulation of unsuspecting Traditional Owners was published in the Melbourne AGE newspaper on August 18, 2014.

One must ask why this person still remains Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s appointed special adviser on indigenous affairs (or should that read “ENFORCER” ) and why his obsessive hatred of white people has not been addressed?

 

Dropping bombs and stoking feuds: the other side of Noel Pearson

noel-pearson-1

By Paul Sheehan

Shortly after 11 am last Friday, Noel Pearson, chairman of the Cape York Group and a nationally prominent Aboriginal leader, walked into the newsroom of The Sydney Morning Herald and approached a senior editor. He proceeded to berate the editor, loudly, obscenely. He took off his jacket and told the editor he would “beat you to a pulp”. He also mentioned throwing him off the balcony. He dropped the “c” bomb repeatedly.

All in the middle of a metropolitan newsroom.

This is the other side of Noel Pearson, the unelected, unaccountable bridge-burner who has left a trail of damage and division that offsets and undermines his efforts to break the cycle of social dysfunction in many indigenous communities.

Tony Abbott is having a shocking run with his inner sanctum. He’s been putting out fires lit by his Treasurer, his Attorney-General, his Minister for Employment, his Treasurer, again, and now his personally appointed special adviser on indigenous affairs.

Abbott’s appointment of Pearson now looks well-meaning but obtuse. If Pearson were to ever appear in court in a defamation action over being called a bully, the court would be presented with voluminous evidence of his foul temper and self-indulgent rages, some of which have been recorded on tape.

One of his tirades was recorded by a former federal minister. Even after Pearson was advised he was being taped he continued a long, expletive-laden soliloquy of abuse and invective. The current Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, is also reported to have been subject to one of Pearson’s rages, repeatedly being told to “f— off”.

The trigger for Pearson’s rage on Friday was an old sore, a profile published in Good Weekend  two years ago, on August 25, 2012, by Jane Cadzow. The profile was rigorously researched and crafted, a trademark of Cadzow’s work. She has won two Walkley Awards for feature writing and been a Walkley finalist four times.

Cadzow’s request for an interview with Pearson had been turned down. Yet on the morning her profile appeared he was on the phone delivering a long blast of outrage. He was aggrieved that it had been written while he was receiving treatment for cancer and that Cadzow did not go up to Cape York when researching the story.

But Cadzow was not going to Cape York without an interview with Pearson. She also felt his rage over the phone vindicated her portrayal of his anger, based on many sources.

“His call went on so long,” she told me, “and I had so little chance to get a word in, that I even made a cup of tea … It was ironic that while he was complaining about the story his behaviour fitted exactly with the pattern I had reported.”

Her profile began with this confronting scene: The meeting began cordially enough. A Queensland government delegation was in Cairns to confer with Noel Pearson, the most influential indigenous leader in the country. Pleasantries were exchanged as people took their places around the table, then the room fell silent while everyone waited respectfully for him to speak.

What followed, according to former parliamentarian Stephen Robertson, was “a tirade of expletives and abuse”, including, more than once, the phrase “f—ing white c—s”…  starting very slowly, very deliberately, and speaking quite softly, then over the next 15 or 20 minutes reaching a crescendo”.

Among those present was state environment minister Kate Jones, whose female adviser was dismissed by Pearson as an “arse-wipe”. Robertson says his own chief-of-staff, an indigenous man, was called a “sell-out c—“. Another member of the group sums up the rest of the diatribe: “‘You f—ing white c—s’, scream, scream, scream. Full on, for half an hour. Nobody could get a word in.”

The story presented a troubling portrait of a charismatic bully who has extracted millions of dollars of funding for indigenous programs from governments and corporations, via persuasion or browbeating. The portrait of Pearson’s older brother, Gerhardt, was also troubling. The profile was balanced with the many positives for which Pearson is famous – his intellect, his lucidity and his commitment to practical improvements for Australia’s poorest communities.

I’ve interviewed Pearson, seen him speak, seen a room captivated by his eloquence, and  written in his favour. But his positives are offset by his negatives, the feuds, the disdain, the costly demands on the public purse.

And his bullying is often premeditated. Cadzow interviewed many people including a former close associate of Pearson who became an adversary, Lyndon Schneiders of the Wilderness Society. He described how Noel and Gerhardt Pearson planned their intimidation: “They called it ‘bombing’. When they were going to go in and make their views forcefully known to government, they were going on a ‘bombing raid’. I watched them do it to advisers, to backbenchers, to ministers, to journos. It wasn’t pretty.”

Even the journalist who did more than any other to push the Pearson mythology, Tony Koch, came to regret his long silence about Pearson’s dark side. In a column for The Australian in April 2012, he wrote: “Instead of drawing people into his orbit, Pearson has succeeded in pushing almost everyone away.”

This does not augur well for his role as Abbott’s emissary. Pearson’s story forms just a fractional part of the tens of billions of dollars of government funding that has been funnelled into indigenous communities and programs with little impact on measurable improvement. The public’s exasperation and cynicism is rampant. It pays the bills.

Pearson’s most recent explosion, on Friday, is emblematic of a man who cannot control his anger or curb his ego. This does not serve his cause. It also damages the cause of the Prime Minister he is supposedly helping.

 

Source: http://www.theage.com.au/comment/dropping-bombs-and-stoking-feuds-the-other-side-of-noel-pearson-20140817-1053ie.html

 

 

NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT WHITE PAPER SHREDDED BY CAPE YORK LAND COUNCIL

by Robert J Lee

LIBERAL GOVERNMENT LEFT WITH EGG ALL OVER ITS FACE

THE CAIRNS POST AND THE ABC HAVE HAD THIS STORY FOR 3 WEEKS BUT WILL NOT TOUCH IT

TROUBLE AHEAD FOR ALL RESIDENTS OF CAPE YORK PENINSULA WITH A NEW INDIGENOUS STATE TO BE CREATED

 Cape York Land Council takes control of the Peninsula Development Road on Cape York Peninsula.

Cape York Land Council says the $210 million Mein Deviation road job near Weipa can start

The prospect of Northern Development hailed by the Federal Government as the panacea for northern Australia has been placed on the back foot after the State Government and the Cape York Land Council signed an agreement allowing the Land Council to control the Peninsula Development Road, the main arterial access to Cape York.

The Land Council claims it wants jobs for local community residents but some Cape Traditional Owners, businessmen and pastoralists believe it to be a “greedy land grab for the few at the top of the CYLC” that will not benefit most struggling communities.

There will be more of the traditional CYLC ‘jobs for their boys’ who in most cases are never local indigenous businesses. Richie AhMat, Gerhardt and Noel Pearson are in bed with the big boys and their predictions of jobs for  Peninsula indigenous contractors like most of their other failed, expensive schemes will also fail local businesses, contractors and the long-suffering community resident.

gerhardt-pearson

Gerhart Pearson

Noel Peason

Noel Peason

ritchie

Ritchie AhMat

The state and federal governments have rolled over to the unrepresentative CYLC yet again. Next comes the new Aboriginal state of Cape York above the 16th Parallel with the TOLL gates set at Laura or Lakeland.

 

Every local authority in the nation should be terrified about the hijacking of this vital state government-owned road that is the only land access to important northern defence facilities and the major mining town of Weipa.

Meanwhile September is a few days away and the wet season a few months away.  Starting such major roadworks near Weipa that should have begun in May will be a disaster for the unlucky contractor, soon to be announced.

And the annual $25 billion Aboriginal industry, taxpayer feeding frenzy continues for CYLC and Balkanu…….. 

Meetings to discuss Cape York issues to be held soon

flyer-1A series of meetings about the Penisula Development Road will be held next week across Cape York Peninsula.

Contact: info@cyfs.com.au – (07) 40532856

Meeting Dates:

Cooktown Monday 3rd August 5.30pm – 7pm Sovereign Resort

Coen Hotel Wednesday 5th August 4.00pm – 5.30pm

Lakeland Hotel Monday 3rd August  2.00pm – 3.30pm

Laura Tuesday 4th August 10am – 11.30am Quinkan Hotel

Lockhart River Church Hall Tuesday 11th August 10am – 12.30pm

Loyalty beach camp ground and fishing lodge Friday 7th August 5.30pm – 7pm

Musgrave Roadhouse Tuesday 4th August 3.30pm – 5pm

Weipa Albatross Bay Resort Tuesday 6th August 5.30pm – 7pm

Warren-EntschIt would seem Federal Member for Leichhardt, Warren Entsch has been fence sitting over this issue and continues to ignore the voice of the people. He may have started his own political demise with voter anger reaching boiling point in North Queensland.

FACEBOOK PUBLICATION

Gerhardt Pearson Facebook Source:    https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009743923034

 Landmark agreement paves way for Peninsula Development Road

Published on Facebook – 29 July 2015

THE Cape York Land Council today signed an important agreement which paves the way for the start of construction on the Mein Deviation and other sections of the Peninsula Development Road, known as the PDR.

Under this agreement, the Queensland Government and Native Title Holders will now begin negotiations to settle an Indigenous Land Use Agreement for the whole of the PDR by the end of 2015. These negotiations follow the lodgment and registration of one of Australia’s largest native title claims earlier in the year, over Cape York.

Chairman of the Cape York Land Council, Mr Richie Ah Mat, said the Department of Transport and Main Roads could now finalise contract arrangements for construction to commence next week.

“There has been a mammoth effort by the Queensland Government and the Cape York Land Council to settle these outstanding matters over the last two months and our meetings over the last two days have endorsed our approach,” he said.

The agreement addresses Indigenous employment, training and business opportunities, cultural heritage clearance processes and environmental considerations.

“On Cape York, where the Indigenous community is battling very high unemployment, high incarceration rates and alcohol and drug abuse, projects such as the PDR are critical in providing opportunity to our mob,” said Mr Ahmat.

“This is a great example of the State Government recognising the Native Title and cultural interests of Traditional Owners to maintain respectful ongoing relationships to carry the PDR to completion.”

Under the agreement, a Traditional Owner steering committee has been established that will guide the settlement of the Indigenous Land Use Agreement with the Queensland Government.

Mr Ahmat said that it was very important for Traditional Owner groups to work together on major linear projects such as the PDR. “An important principle of the Native Title claim has been that Traditional Owners speak for their country,” he said.

“Prior to the settlement of the Indigenous Land Use Agreement, there will need to be further discussions with Traditional Owners from along the road route”.

Southern Kandju and Negotiating committee member, Dion Creek, praised the agreement.

“For the first time, the State Labor Government, Cape York Land Council, and Traditional Owners have respectfully negotiated a single agreement covering the PDR,” he said.

“There can be no longer be any excuse for our people to remain on the sidelines, when it comes to capitalising on investments for the PDR and other road networks throughout Cape York.

Mr Creek said that PDR investments specified in the agreement would be used to increase the capacity of Indigenous people, through the provision of training and employment, enterprise facilitation and the commitment to support local business.

“We have a jobs crisis in Cape York,” he said. “It is a priority we must address

land-council-signing

Cape York’s new Labor Member will have his job cut out

The ETU, CYLC, Balkanu and Bill Gordon

The Electrical Trades Union claims it dispatched 6000 of its drones from Melbourne, Tasmania and New South Wales to converge on polling booths and towns across the state. In the electorate of Cook that stretches from the PNG border to Mareeba(60klm west of Cairns), ETU minions adorned with their red Billy Gordon(ALP) T shirts clutching ‘no sale of assets’ green signs assisted indigenous candidate and now Member for Cook Bill Gordon with his election campaign. The ETU assailed the inhabitants of the Torres Strait, Thursday Island, Bamaga and Aurukun with their presence and dominance at pre-polling centres in communities across the top of Cape York Peninsula and Torres Strait. What policy deals have been done between the ETU, Bill Gordon, the Greens and the dodgy Cape York Land Council and its business arm, Balkanu, are not yet evident.

What is evident however, in true ALP style, is that a bus load of indigenous rent-a-vote people was seen arriving at the Mareeba pre-polling centre to vote, evidently for Bill Gordon. How this crowd was able to bypass the new identification requirement of the Electoral Commission is not yet known.

The sad part of the Cape York Peninsula result is that rank-and-file Aborigines, duped by the CYLC and Balkanu believe that their plight might change with the election of CLYC puppet, Bill Gordon. Nothing could be further from the truth. When in government the ALP shut down the Peninsula with Wild Rivers and other Green ideology. The ALP and then the LNP allowed the CYLC and Balkanu to manipulate communities and their leaders, depriving them of funds intended to lift the living standards of its languishing people.

billy-gordon

Billy Gordon

The federal government handed self-appointed indigenous leader Noel Pearson $22 million for his pet school curriculum, that none of the communities seem to want. If that was not enough the Liberals dished out a further $8 million to another of Pearson’s private companies for a training program.

Billy Gordon will be hard pressed to appease those who backed him in the election campaign. He is heavily indebted to the ETU and the union movement in general, the hopeless Greens, Cape York Land Council and Balkanu.

 

 

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