Category Archives: aborigines

Hanson tackles Section 18c Racial Discrimination Act in the senate

Hansard November 24, 2016

Pauline Hanson addresses the racial Discrimination Act

Senator HANSON (Queensland) (10:48): I have listened to some comments in this chamber today and all I hear about is racism. Let me make my point very clear. When I first came into parliament I stood on the ground of equality for all Australians—equality regardless of race, colour or creed. Also, what I have tried to make quite clear is that, yes, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people were the first peoples of this land here. Yes, Australia was colonised and people came here. Since then, many migrants from around the world have sought to make Australia their home. They have come here to join us and to be one of us, and I welcome that. My first husband was actually Polish. He was a migrant after the Second World War who came to Australia for a new life with his mother.

I have had involvement with people of all different cultural backgrounds. The manager of my shop—my fish and chip shop—was also a refugee from Laos. I had the highest regard for her and we worked very well together. I had properties that I actually rented out to an Aboriginal lady and her child. My children grew up in the same street with Aboriginal children. My association will all different cultures has been one that I have cherished. My parents were people that welcomed anyone into their homes, and that is how I was taught. I have respect for so many different cultures and the people. Respect is earned by the person, not purely based on who they are or their race. It must be earned.

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People say, ‘Why are we standing up here and speaking out against the words “to offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate”?’ Today times have changed greatly. People have come to our country. I remember most, years ago when they came, there were the Greeks, the Italians and different ones. They were called wogs. They keep telling me, ‘My god, we actually had everything thrown at us. We were abused, but we said no. We got on with it.’ Because when the Aussies had a go at them in that Aussie way they became part of the community—they assimilated. I remember all the guys at the fish markets—the Greeks and the Italians. We all had jokes together and it was taken in a good sense of humour. I think we have lost that in Australia. I think people have become so precious that you cannot say or do anything anymore. Otherwise, you will be dragged off to the law courts.

You talk about racism. Let’s define the word ‘racism’. A racist is a person who believes their race to be superior to another. Understand the meaning. When you criticise or you have a point of difference, do not counteract that by saying it is a racist comment. I am fed up with people in this parliament and even outside this place calling me a racist, yet they cannot define one word that I have ever said in policy or anything that is racist.

I remember years ago, when I was first elected, I went to have a meeting with the Aboriginal elders. It was set up with the media. I remember they came out and called me a pig in mud and white trash. The media actually printed it. Then, when I actually spoke to them about it, they said, ‘Well, what’s wrong with that?’ I can well imagine if I had reversed the words, but I never did. What I am hearing now is all one way—it is one-sided. Let’s have a debate on this.

Senator McKim says here, ‘If we change it and get rid of 18C, what do you want to say that you can’t say now?’ I will say, through you, Madam Deputy President, a case in point is those students. What did they say on the Facebook page? They said it is ‘segregation with segregation’. So they were shut down. What is that? That is not an insult. It was pure fact. They actually went to the university and they wanted to go into a room and use computers that were purely marked for Aboriginals only. That is racist in itself. Why didn’t they go and complain about 18C? Why wasn’t something done about it? It is not; they are protected because we have laws in this country now that protect anyone who is not of a colour or anyone from another race criticising the Australians. It has become now, in Australia, reverse racism. That is why Australians are fed up with it. That is why they are saying they want change. It has gotten to a point where you cannot have a say anymore. I am okay; I am in this chamber. I am protected. I can say what I want to say here, but not if I go outside this chamber and say it outside, like many Australians. We cannot have an opinion. We cannot say anything anymore.

Senator Dodson made a comment. He said up until 1967 he was not included in the census, and that was true, but the Aboriginal people did have the vote prior to that. I believe it was Western Australia; please correct me if I am wrong. The whole fact is that Australians believed at the time of the referendum in treating Aboriginal people equally. That is why the majority of Australians—around 97 or 98 per cent—voted for that: they wanted equality and they did not want the separation anymore. Senator Dodson says that Aboriginal people were not included in the Constitution. Actually, section 51(xxvi) of the Australian Constitution, in the time before the referendum, said that the Commonwealth shall make specific laws for any race other than Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. The framers of that Constitution, our leaders who drew up the Constitution in the 1890s, put in that ability to make specific laws for any race other than Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, and that was because of the Chinese and Afghanis in this country—mainly the Chinese—because of opium and the immigration. That is why it was put in. It was not put in for any reason to do with Aboriginal people at all. It was to do with that.

Senator Dodson talks about words—they can be hurtful and words are what are happening in Syria and the fighting around the world. I do not believe it is just about words. I think it is about hatred of a religion that is casting their hate and their political ideology onto the rest of the world. That is what is behind this. I do believe that we will have the same problem in Australia if we do not address it and have the right to debate it to find the answers so that each and every one of us can live in peace and harmony on our streets and not live in fear of being dragged before the courts. I am pleased to hear that Senator McKim is following my Facebook page. He made a mention of it. Maybe he will learn a lot more from how the Australian people really feel.

What I am saying here today is: is it really going too far to have an opinion that we offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate someone? Maybe the people in Australia should start looking at others of a different religious background to us, so that they may start to think twice before they make their comments on the streets towards our young ladies who wish to not cover themselves up or dress in the fashion of a short skirt and who are then told they are nothing but the meat market. There are women on our beaches who cannot go swimming, because others are offensive towards them. There is a lot of this going on this country, yet there are people in this chamber who will not acknowledge it, and I am sick and tired of seeing them stand up for one race or other people in this country, who do not see themselves as Australians and who have no intentions of ever assimilating. We are told constantly, time and time again, that we must be tolerant. Well, I have had it up to here with my tolerance. I believe that we have a right to have an opinion, have a say and debate it. I will go back to the point: I welcome anyone who has come to this country to join us, to assimilate and to respect our culture and way of life. I stand by that. It is a shame that we have come to the point where we need to debate this issue, but that is where our country is headed. I seek leave to continue my remarks later.

Leave granted; debate adjourned.

We do not owe the blackfellas a living

Aboriginal cultural history did not begin until the end of 1945. Prior to the end of WWII indigenous inhabitants of Australia faced a grim future with Japanese imperial forces on our door step and the German army taking over Europe.

It took the US Navy to stem the Japanese tide at the Battle of the Coral Sea in 1942 otherwise it would have been all over for our languishing black population.

Do indigenous agitators think the Japs would have spared their forefathers if they started their mainland push southwards from Darwin or Cairns?

The Aborigines would have been exterminated to a man, but thanks to the heroic Australian army they held off the pagan invaders at Kokoda.

Australian 39th Battalion at Kokoda fought off the Japs

Australian 39th Battalion at Kokoda fought off the Japs

Thankfully there was a scattering of indigenous soldiers in the Australian forces who fought just as hard alongside the white troops and their efforts have been formally recognised.

Violent demonstrations in Sydney about ‘invasion day’ being held on January 26 to commemorate the 1788 arrival of the first fleet have fallen on the deaf ears of mainstream Australia and repulsed while the unwashed, dole collecting, pinko rent-a-crowd clashed with police.

National conscription has again been mooted by One Nation and polling has shown it will be accepted by the rank and file population.

Pauline Hanson. One Nation has mooted a return of national conscription for 17 to 24 year olds

Pauline Hanson. One Nation has mooted a return of national conscription for 17 to 24 year olds

These brain-dead, university indoctrinated Bolsheviks need cleaning out just like the second generation of left-leaning university lecturers and the black militia that have infiltrated the so-called halls of secondary education.

The army needs beefing up, most likely with the aid of a battalion of US Marines who could assist our hopeless Generals with discipline by kicking out the gay brigade and women from front line troops.

Then our military would easily accommodate the hordes of 17 to 24 year olds sucking off the social security teat and show them there is more to life than rallying against and bludging off normal people who really run the country.

US President Donald Trump has started to drain the swamp. Australia needs to drain the swamp and flush out the malcontents as soon as possible.

US President Donald Trump has started to drain the swamp. Australia needs to drain the swamp and flush out the malcontents as soon as possible.

Trump has started with the disinfectant in the US to flush out the same mob from their once-esteemed campuses and to ‘drain the swamp’ a process we should follow as soon as possible, that is when we put the broom through the limp-wristed, politically correct bureaucracy that infests Canberra.

All jobs for the boys in the bureaucracy and judiciary should be declared vacant by the militarist Governor General from June 30, 2017 and then re-employ half the number who sign declarations of non-membership of trade unions, political parties and the Lodge.

Turnbull’s ever- diminishing ‘ruling elite’ and Shorten’s mishmash of miscreants should end up in the mop bucket along with this third generation of bureaucratic malcontents who with the aid of their ideological masters have pushed Australia to a standstill.

Australians must thumb their noses at the international ruling elite whose designs of a one world government will stop with Trump.

Unfortunately we do not yet have a political messiah emerging from the ranks but when the going gets even tougher, the Australian camaraderie historically, will shine through.

No corporate party hacks will be tolerated and in reality it is not a job for a woman.

May God help this country for right now there is nobody else!

Residents call for senate inquiry and audit into Peninsula Development Road construction

A group of Coen residents has called for an independent audit into the distribution of $260 million of federal and state funding allocated for a major upgrade of the Peninsula Development Road.

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Senator Roberts(left) talking to local graziers Paddy Shephard; John and Sally Witherspoon after the meeting, intends to take residents’ concerns over mismanagement of the PDR construction to parliament

One Nation senator Malcolm Roberts was invited to the Coen meeting on Wednesday night to hear the concerns of locals who believe there had been a wide-spread waste of government funds by Roadtek.

Long-time local grazier Paddy Shephard explained to the meeting how an Indigenous Land Use Agreement(ILUA) was about to signed off by the State Government giving part control of the PDR to a “Coen Aboriginal family group” which had no connection  to the highway.

Another resolution was passed at the meeting asking Senator Roberts to instigate a senate inquiry into the granting of an ILUA over the PDR, an important arterial tourist and defence road.

Senator Roberts is no stranger to the Cape having taken a number of holiday trips to the Top.

He said he was at the meeting to listen to the concerns of local people and would do what he could to have the matters investigated.

“It seems the place is being held back and the road is important  for defence and the opening up of the region,” Senator Roberts said.

“There is no accountability and now it seems lots of waste in general and an abuse of power where ordinary people are missing out every day.

“We are losing our sovereignty in government under regulations coming from the United Nations.”

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Senator Roberts discusses with Nichol Keppel the takeover of the PDR by the Cape York Land Council

Businessman Barry Mulley launched an emotional attack on the Cape York Land Council for demanding the PDR be handed over to their elitist members allegedly in order to take a cut of funding for contractors engaged in the upgrade.

“Once they have control of the road they can do what they like with it even charge a toll for tourists to use it and decide which contractors will get jobs,” Mr Mulley said.

“We believe local indigenous people should get jobs on the road but the land council should not be in control of it. There are too many jobs for the boys on big pay that has pushed up the cost of building it.

“There is no accountability from the government or land council in how they spend large amounts taxpayers money.

“I am sick of paying large amounts of tax only to have it wasted by the government on mismanagement of the road works.”

Mr Mulley said Peninsula ratepayers and residents had no political representation which is why Senator Roberts was invited to take their concerns to Parliament.

“Nobody cares about the Peninsula. The government just throws lots of money into it without any accountability,” he added.

The notorious ‘Land Claim Number 1’ according to Cape York Alliance member Jack Wilkie-Jans gave the CYLC the ability to claim ownership of the PDR.

“How do just nine claimants speak for the hundreds of clan groups across the Cape?” he asked.

“Is it any wonder there is such widespread derision among the indigenous and white people of the Cape.”

Vegetation bill makes strange bedmates

Harsh vegetation management laws to be enacted by the State Government have united political identities across the spectrum. Protesters marched on the Gordonvale electorate office of State Treasurer Curtis Pitt on Saturday. Speakers at the rowdy rally of 80 farmers, politicians, indigenous representatives and political aspirants, warned the proposed laws would “shut down” agriculture and make criminals out of farmers if they clear regrowth or vegetation on their farms

Pictured above are L to R, Pixie Hughes, Cape York Sustainable Futures; Cr Brett Moller, Cairns Regional Council; One Nation WA candidate, Rod Culleton; State LNP Member for Hinchinbrook Andrew Cripps and Senator-elect Pauline Hanson.

Pictured above are L to R, Pixie Hughes, Cape York Sustainable Futures; Cr Brett Moller, Cairns Regional Council; One Nation WA candidate, Rod Culleton; State LNP Member for Hinchinbrook Andrew Cripps and Senator-elect Pauline Hanson.

Atherton solicitor Anne English on the doorstep of Curtis Pitt’s office told the rally the new laws turned farmers into criminals by reversing the onus of proof and removing the centuries-old ‘mistaken belief’ principle as a defence if trees are cleared.

Atherton solicitor Anne English on the doorstep of Curtis Pitt’s office told the rally the new laws turned farmers into criminals by reversing the onus of proof and removing the centuries-old ‘mistaken belief’ principle as a defence if trees are cleared.

Indigenous protesters Duncan McInnes, Mareeba and Chairman of the Cape York Alliance Rod Burke

Indigenous protesters Duncan McInnes, Mareeba and Chairman of the Cape York Alliance Rod Burke

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                               Protesters march on Treasurer Curtis Pitt’s Gordonvale office

 

Islamic Yanner a disgrace to the Aboriginal race

Yanner nearly jailed for an attack on a woman in 1997

Aboriginal activist Murrandoo Yanner yesterday verbally abused One Nation leader Pauline Hanson accusing her of being a racist and telling her she was not welcome at the indigenous art show she visited in Cairns.

Yanner, whose Christian name is Jason, comes from the Gulf community of Doomagee near Burketown and like Hanson is no stranger to controversy.

Indigenous industry sources have told Cairns News Yanner converted to Islam about 10 years ago which explains his vile attack. https://www.facebook.com/PaulineHansonAu/videos/492107537660230/

Hanson laughed it off, later releasing a Facebook clip asking Yanner to stand with her against the corruption in various land councils and in government.

Yanner is regarded as a thug among some of his own people and his outburst will win him no friends within the wider Aboriginal community and certainly none at all in the white community.

A Traditional Owner and elder from Cairns called Yanner a “…disgrace, and our community will not tolerate this attack on a woman.”

 

Murrandoo Jason Yanner, regarded as a thug amongst the wider Aboriginal community verbally assaults Pauline Hanson at an art show.

Murrandoo Jason Yanner, regarded as a thug among the wider Aboriginal community verbally assaults Pauline Hanson at an art show.

Yanner was given a suspended jail sentence by a Mt Isa court over his role in a vicious pub brawl. The Court of Appeal found Yanner’s sentence should be increased, ordering he be jailed for 18 months, but wholly suspended the sentence for a period of four years.

The Attorney General had appealed a Mt Isa District Court sentence in which Yanner was placed on community-based orders.

However, in a split decision, one of the three appeal court judges, Chief Justice Paul de Jersey, found Yanner should actually serve time in jail – recommending an 18-month sentence suspended after six months, with an operational period of four years.

“There is no doubt in my mind that Murrandoo Yanner should be actually imprisoned,” Justice de Jersey said in his written judgment.

“His substantial episode of unprovoked vicious and brutal thuggery involved as many as four innocent victims, people who were thereby both physically injured and emotionally traumatised.”

Yanner and his young brother, Bruce Lee Yanner, 21, were involved in the fight outside the Burketown Hotel in May 1997. Yanner had pleaded guilty in the Mt Isa District Court to three charges of assault causing bodily harm and one of assault causing bodily harm in company, over attacks on a woman, a Telstra worker and a male nurse.

ABC 7.30 Report airs another untruthful story about embattled Cape York and reef runoff

from Jim O’Toole at Cooktown

The highly controversial purchase of the 150,000 acre Springvale Station, 50 klms west of Cooktown by the State Government is refusing to die in the media, in spite of a recent scientific report clearing the Lakeland farming district of any reef runoff from the Springvale river catchment.

Taking advantage of annual coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef , 200 nautical miles north of Cooktown that this year covered a larger than normal area, ABC Television and their usual Green bed mates have wasted tens of thousands of dollars of taxpayers money with false and misleading reports.

Tuesday night’s 7.30 Report hosted by Mark Willacy took the cake.

After lower Cape York Peninsula viewers last year were treated to one of the most misleading reports ever broadcast by the ABC about land clearing at Olive Vale station, 60 klms to the north, WWF head kicker Andrew Picone was joined on the show by Tim Hughes of the South Endeavour Trust.

Local viewers said the story was devoid of fact and an insult to Peninsula farmers and cattle producers who believed comments by Mr Hughes amounted to a “bid for paid management rights.”

“Never let the facts get in the way of a Green story,” another landowner, who asked not to be named, told Cairns News.

Tim Hughes, through the South Endeavour Trust, manages the neighbouring property Kings Plains.

The Trust has 10 properties in its portfolio, purportedly managed by Mr Hughes for ‘conservation values.’

Predictably the ABC trotted out an indigenous group from Laura to visit the seasonal river.

They said members of their community visited the Normanby to catch fish and for recreational camping.

Cairns News can report that some indigenous people regard river beds as rubbish dumps, as the picture below of the nearby Laura River shows.

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Rubbish from an Aboriginal camp site left in the bed of the Laura River

This campsite in the Laura River bed was photographed last year after a group of indigenous people left a mountain of rubbish behind. Beer bottles, food wrapping, an old mattress and disposable baby nappies were strewn about the river bed.

It was not removed and ended up being flushed down the river in the first fresh late last year.

Kings Plains manager Daryl Paradise and Mr Picone claimed a mining application by former Cook Shire Mayor and onetime owner of Springvale, Graham Elmes would silt-up the entire Barrier Reef if mining in the sandy bed of the West Normanby River went ahead.

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The West Normanby River 50 klm west of Cooktown locked up by the State Government to prevent construction of an irrigation dam

Mr Elmes explained that removing gold or tin from sandy river beds is quite common in the Far North.

A large gold dredge was operating in the Mitchell River last year and the rich Palmer River had been extensively mined in this way for 120 years, without any evidence of serious river degradation.

Along with Mark Willacy, who was present at nearby Lakeland three weeks ago when the Great Barrier Reef Water Science Task Force gave the entire catchment area of the Normanby River system a clean bill of health, Mr Hughes seemed to be unaware of this finding. http://www.gbr.qld.gov.au/documents/gbrwst-interim-report-highres.pdf

Chief Scientist for Queensland, Dr Geoff Garrett, who heads the Task Force, told farmers in late May that the study found no measurable runoff coming from the Normanby catchment area that eventually runs into the sea.

This makes the $7m purchase of Springvale a rather spurious acquisition to halt alleged reef runoff.

Most farmers agree the well-improved cattle station, which runs 3500 breeder cattle, was purchased solely to prevent the proposed West Normanby dam site from going ahead.

Prior to the election, the Federal Government allocated $825,000 to conduct a feasibility study for a new dam site to provide reliable irrigation water for the nearby, expanding Lakeland farming district.

A substantial State Government budget allocation was made for the purpose of progressing World Heritage nominations for Cape York Peninsula.

The WWF and ACF have for two decades or more pushed the ALP to nominate the entire Cape for World Heritage, in defiance of the wishes of all Aboriginal communities.

A new Liberal Government will not override state vegetation laws

A new Federal Liberal Government would not legislate over the states to negate tough vegetation management laws proposed by the Queensland Labor Government.

In answer to a question from the floor at a landowners rally at Lakeland, near Cooktown, Senator Matthew Canavan said an incoming Liberal Government would not interfere.

This response falls into line with the original vegetation laws imposed on Australia by former PM John Howard, as a signatory to the UN Agenda 21 agreement.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has stated a Labor Government would wipe out any soft vegetation laws enacted by Queensland, conversely prompting a call for the Liberals to remove harsh laws.

Farmer’s organisation Agforce has warned all landowners the state could be virtually shut down by the ALP causing the loss of thousands of jobs and costing primary industries tens of millions of dollars in lost revenue.

Indigenous communities would be the hardest hit, according to spokesman Noel Pearson, who maintains that generational white farmers also have ‘land rights.’

The Member for Kennedy Bob Katter said KAP in State Parliament would do whatever it could to block vegetation bill, due to be debated in August.

Shorten and Turnbull-The Liberals will not counteract draconian vegetation laws proposed by a new Labor Government

Shorten and Turnbull-The Liberals will not counteract draconian vegetation laws proposed by the State Labor Government

Will Billy Gordon protect his indigenous constituents from the lunatic fringe of the ALP and Greens closing down development?

Cape York development uncertainty must be removed

15 April 2016

AgForce has welcomed the State Government’s commitment to develop large-scale business and tourism ventures in remote indigenous communities, but said planned changes to vegetation management laws must be scrapped if the Government is serious about job creation in Cape York.

Representatives from the Queensland Investment Corporation, Treasury officials, Queensland Resources Council and Indigenous groups from Cape York, Palm Island and the state’s north-west discussed the plans at an investment forum this week in Cairns.

Queensland’s Indigenous Affairs Minister Curtis Pitt was reported as saying there was a lot of untapped potential in northern Australia.

“We’re hoping to draw out some of the needs and aspirations of people not only in the Cape but right across the state,” Mr Pitt said. (Source: ABC News Online, 14 April 2016)

AgForce President Grant Maudsley said the Queensland Government could start by removing the uncertainty over future agricultural development in places like Cape York by scrapping its planned changes to the State’s vegetation management laws.

“It’s clear both indigenous & non-indigenous graziers on the Cape will be prevented from developing their properties and growing more of their own hay to feed cattle,” he said.

“Traditional owners and long-time cattle producers are telling us that this issue has united them in a way that hasn’t happened for many years.

“They are angry that there has been little or no consultation by the Government about the proposed changes and this is creating frustration and confusion.

Independent MP Billy Gordon with his Labor hero, former PM Kevin Rudd. Gordon has been accused of dumping his indigenous constituents in return for re-admittance to the Labor Party

“If Curtis Pitt and his Government are fair dinkum about talking to Cape York communities about developing jobs, and a meaningful future, then they should start with existing businesses like the beef industry.

“It has traditionally been a significant employer and income-earner for indigenous communities and should be allowed to develop to its full potential. But that can’t happen if the tough new vegetation management rules apply.”

Wik Mukan tribal elder and cattleman Willie Lawrence told an AgForce Queensland workshop in Coen this week that he wanted the local State MP Billy Gordon to meet with traditional owners and understand what is at stake if the changes go ahead.

“If Billy Gordon came up here I can talk to him, he can get ideas from me about these new tree laws and the other things like National Parks locking us out of our traditional country,” he said.

“We can have a good yarn and he can understand me and I can understand him.” (Photos of Willie Lawrence at the AgForce workshop are available upon request)

AgForce has been holding workshops throughout Cape York this week and the workshops continue today in Laura and then in Cooktown on Monday.

State and Federal Governments will soon clash head-on over northern agricultural development

The Federal Government’s Northern Development legislative program could take a hit should a double dissolution election be called on July 2. The Government has pledged $5 Billion for development from the Kimberley region in Western Australia to eastern Cape York Peninsula. The enabling bill to secure this massive project could stall and not be presented at the next Parliamentary sittings.

Agriculture will be the main beneficiary of the long sought after strategy with large-scale irrigated cropping projects to be funded on a 50-50 basis, starting at $50 million.

The CSIRO has been charged with mapping the areas of arable soils across the north, already identifying 16 million hectares, about 5 per cent of the total northern land mass.

The notion of Northern Development and large scale irrigated farmland has been around for decades but its main proponent in more recent years has been Kennedy MP Bob Katter.

He says the Government must get the bill through Parliament before the election, because he did not trust the Labor Party to continue with the scheme should it win on July 2.

Katter urged the Member for Leichardt and chairman of the Joint Select Committee On Northern Australia, Warren Entsch to ensure it is passed through both Houses at the next sitting starting April 18.

“The CSIRO might have found several dam sites on eastern Cape York, but the State Labor Government and their bed-mates the WWF, Wilderness Society and CAFNEC are hell bent on shutting the Peninsula down to prevent any agriculture or other development, thus denying indigenous communities jobs and a future,” Mr Katter pointed out.

“Successive state governments have plastered the entire Cape York Peninsula with environmental overlays covering about 70 per cent of its land mass, stopping any economic development for pastoralists and indigenous communities, so we must get some development on what is left.”

CSIRO researcher Dr Peter Stone has been heading up the North Australia Water Resources Assessment looking for substantial dam sites to irrigate proposed large scale farmland.

Dr Stone told ABC Radio that 16 million hectares of arable soils had been identified as suitable for irrigation and 90 dams sites had been found to provide up to 15,000 gigalitres of stored water.

The north was inundated with an average 2 million gigalitres of rainfall each year, of which 90 per cent evaporates, 10 per cent goes into streams and about 2 per cent enters the groundwater storage, he said.

“The research by CSIRO proves these projects can be taken seriously and I have been pushing for 20 years that northern development has to occur, because for too long southern cities have lived off our coat tails of copper, coal and cattle and its time we put this country back on track,” Mr Katter said.

 

Aboriginal leader Noel Pearson(above) has been scathing of the State Government over land use on the Peninsula. At a recent Mareeba meeting he stressed the need for more secure land tenure on the Peninsula and likened proposed draconian vegetation management laws to a “re-run of Wild Rivers,” an impost he said he had fought to get rid of for five years.

Nearly 70 per cent of Cape York covered by nature reserves or national parks; little left for Aboriginal economic benefit

Aboriginal people of Cape York Peninsula are being duped and dudded by the State Government over large land ‘hand overs’ that the local communities believe will prevent them from earning income.

On April 7, another 54,000 hectares north of Cooktown was handed over to several tribal groups from Hopevale, adding even more locked-up land to the vast national park estate on Cape York.

Since the CYPLUS (Cape York Peninsula Land Use Study) research of the 80’s and early 90’s once productive grazing land has steadily been resumed by State Governments, mainly the ALP, to be gazetted as national park or some type of nature reserve.

Nature reserves, national parks, regional parks, timber reserves and DOGIT land shaded areas cover at least 70 per cent of the Peninsula leaving small areas for grazing or commercial purposes that are not of any economic benefit to Aboriginal groups

Various Aboriginal corporations gratefully sign up to vast areas of former cattle stations, such as the Olkola people when last year they were handed five, once viable large cattle properties in central Cape York Peninsula totalling 1.5 million acres that used to run 30,000 cattle.

The Prescribed Body Corporate gleefully accepted the gift from the State Government, but seemingly did not properly read the paperwork. The PBC just helped the National Parks and Wildlife Service add another one million acres to their vast estate, on which no cattle grazing is allowed.

The remaining portion of Aboriginal Freehold can be used for grazing or selective timber cutting, but under the ALP environmental laws would have to be excluded from the nature reserves and park area by fencing it off.

The fencing would cost several million dollars and require maintenance on a weekly basis to be effective.

Indigenous leader Noel Pearson angrily said, “…again Aborigines have been duped by the Labor/Green bureaucracy.”

Noel Pearson sick and tired of being ‘dudded’ by the Labor/Green bureaucracy

Pearson heaped vitriol on the Labor and former LNP governments at a large meeting of stakeholders in Mareeba recently for dudding the communities of Cape York over land use.

“We have no property rights on Cape York and we need upgraded tenure. There are lots of fronts where all landowners are vulnerable,” he said.

Public servants who once worked for environmental lobby groups were targeted by Pearson for pushing extreme green agendas within government.

“These greens have infiltrated indigenous groups and government departments and it’s like a tag team, they are all the same, and have networked with all departments,” Mr Pearson said.

“Public servants should declare their association with environmental groups.

“The proposition there is going to be land clearing the size of Victoria, is fantasy.

“There are only pockets of land suitable for development.

“White people too have had many generations on this land and they have a great love for their land. It’s high time the law in Queensland started to respect that relationship.

“We spent five hard years and lots of money fighting Wild Rivers in court but we could have been doing other more productive things.

“We need another 10 independents in parliament to put us in a better position, given the absence of an Upper House.”

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