Category Archives: Paris Climate Accord

Behind the Green Mask

Australia is a signatory to Agenda 21. We were signed up by the Federal Government in 1992. As with America, Local Government Authorities have implemented ‘model statutes’ directly from this massive anti-development UN document. Don’t miss this great video of author Rosa Koire (link at bottom of page) exposing the green agenda.

Agenda 21 document:

 https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/Agenda21.pdf

by Alex Bruce

It’s funny how so many topics once deemed to be “Tinfoil Hat conspiracy theories” keep getting proven to be fact. Concern about Agenda 21, aka the United Nations’ plan for Sustainable Development(depopulation) is an example.

Agenda 21 was placed front and center before Americans last week in the form of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’ Green New Deal. Among its unrealistic goals, the Green New Deal aims to restructure the entire global energy economy within 10 years by completely “transitioning” the US out of fossil fuels and nuclear energy and into renewables, like wind and solar power.

Australia should get out of the United Nations

What few will admit is that this plan implies genocide. As evidenced by the collapse of Rome and demonstrated repeatedly by successive societies, the halving of energy consumption leads directly to the collapse of human populations.

As a Bay Area forensic commercial real estate appraiser and expert witness, Rosa Koire observed how property owners in Northern California have been barred from using their own properties, making these cheap when the Government wants to acquire them for Eminent Domain.

While investigating this, Koire ran into Agenda 21 – or as she calls it, “The biggest public relations scam in the history of the world,” and how this global plan aims to break down economies and to depopulate areas considered to be rural or suburban, concentrating populations into larger cities.

“This is the plan. It’s the loss of our industry, our agriculture, our food independence. Ultimately, it’s the loss of our sovereignty, as a free nation…It’s social engineering…it’s the acceptance of what I call the ‘new poverty’.”

She covers the anti-human Senate Bill 1867, which brands the common people as “enemy combatants” in the eyes of the Government and she describes how Agenda 21 is being rolled-out – never by name – this is carefully avoided. Hence, the Green New Deal. Agenda 21 programs can be identified by their “communitarian” ethos and we need only look to the economic disaster now facing Germany to see what such anti-growth green economic policies have wrought.

As Koire points out, Agenda 21 is a global initiative being carried out locally. But there is hope on the horizon, in that the Yellow Vest protests have now begun to emerge in Germany, while they continue to rage in France. The Gilets Jaunes are a direct response to the implementation of such anti-human Agenda 21 policies.

Running Time: 35 mins

https://forbiddenknowledgetv.net/behind-the-green-mask-agenda-21/

Australia in boots and all with climate racketeers at Poland conference

Liberal and Labor supported 46 emissaries now back home to spread climate scare stories while the absent US throws a party to celebrate fossil fuels

December 16, 2018

Negotiators from around the world struck an eleventh-hour deal Saturday, laying out rules to implement the Paris Agreement and keep the landmark 2015 climate accord intact.

But it wasn’t easy.

The two-week, drawn-out fight that included a rehashing of old battles and the introduction of new ones stretched late into the night here at the COP 24 UN climate conference in Katowice, Poland. The pitched battle hints at challenges to come in the global fight against climate change as the new world order continue to face a wave of political pressure that has put a strain on international cooperation.

15 December 2018, Poland, Katowice:  Australia sent 46 bureaucrats agreeing to shut down the remnants of domestic industry.  President Michal Kurtyka (M) of the UN Climate Change Conference COP24, and other participants of the climate summit are pleased about the decision of the compromise at the world climate summit. The aim of the agreement is to limit global warming to well below two degrees. Photo: Monika Skolimowska/dpa-Zentralbild/dpa (Photo by Monika Skolimowska/picture alliance via Getty Images)

“It has been a long road,” said Polish Energy State Secretary Michał Kurtyka, who served as President of the conference. “This deal hangs in fragile balance, we will all have to give in order to gain.

The issues on the table in Katowice were largely technical questions centering on accounting, finance and seemingly arcane word choices that signal how aggressively countries will cut their emissions. But geopolitics never lurked far from the surface, and the urgency of climate change never proved great enough to keep the politics from bubbling up and disrupting proceedings.

“People are pulling away at the edges of the multilateral system and you wonder whether or not it’s going to unravel further,” said Rachel Kyte, who headed the World Bank’s climate-change program and who now leads Sustainable Energy for All, before the final decision. “Is the beginning of something bigger? How do we cope with it?”

The potential for disruption was clear from the beginning. The U.S., the world’s biggest economy and second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, promised to exit the Paris Agreement last year under President Trump’s direction. This left a void in leadership even as the U.S. officially remains in the talks until it’s eligible to withdraw in 2020. That void opened the door for others to rebel, particularly in places where climate change does not jive with the priorities of populist or authoritarian governments.

In a highly-publicized affair, the U.S. held an event promoting fossil fuels, during which a White House official argued that the country was injecting a dose of “reality” in the face of “alarmism” around climate change. The event won the support of Australia, whose ambassador for the environment joined the panel. And a senior administration official said that other countries had conveyed that they appreciate the U.S. perspective even if they don’t feel comfortable stating so publicly. “They don’t talk about it as much,” said a senior administration official. But, “there’s an appreciation for the realism.”

 

In another conflict, Brazil faced off against the rest of the world when it threatened to reject any deal because of language that would fix an accounting loophole that gives the country double credit for preserving forests in the Amazon. The rest of world protested, but Brazil refused to budge and in the final hours negotiators decided to punt the issue to a future conference.

One of the biggest clamors of the conference came as four oil producing countries, including the U.S, Russia and Saudi Arabia, questioned the validity of climate science and refused to recognize the legitimacy of a report from the IPCC, the UN’s climate science body, showing the effects of climate change if temperatures rise more than 1.5°C.

Changing geopolitics even hit in places where governments care deeply about the threat of climate change. The wave of populism in the European Union fractured the block, weakening its negotiating position. Alden Meyer, director of strategy and policy at the Union of Concerned Scientists and a longtime climate negotiations expert, cited political change in Italy, the ongoing Brexit fiasco and the weak positions of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emanuel Macron as contributing to the E.U.’s struggle to wrangle other countries. “There’s always some of these clashes, but it’s more acute here,” he says.

And then there’s the U.S. relationship with China, which is in disarray over ongoing trade issues. The two countries, while often at odds in previous negotiations, often served as mediators between developing and developed countries and helped broker key deals. “There was a capacity to be a convener, each of us,” says Todd Stern, who served as the chief U.S. negotiator under Obama, of the U.S. and China. “That’s not available right now.”

All of these disruptions helped push the talks long into overtime, with a mix of yawns and applause when Kurtyka finally called the conference to an end more than a day later than originally scheduled. The deal that resulted came as a relief: the multilateral approach to fighting climate change will live to see another day.

At the same time, the new agreement left much to be desired from nearly all parties. “I trust that whenever you found dissatisfaction in one part of the text, it was balanced with satisfaction in another,” said Kurtyka.

Perhaps more importantly, all but the most out-of-touch acknowledged that the deal leaves much work to be done if the world actually hopes to limit temperature rise to 1.5°C, a level that the new IPCC report shows could wipe some countries off the map and cause widespread devastation across the planet.

“Carbon emissions keep rising and rising,” Mohamed Nasheed, former president of the Maldives, told reporters before the deal was finalized. “All we seem to be doing is talking and talking and talking.”

As countries continue to wind through the difficult international negotiation process, the obvious answer to make up for the gap caused by political disruption lies outside of the political system. Indeed, some local governments, businesses and apolitical multilateral organizations are already trying to take charge.

For most of the two decades that the U.N. has held these meetings, talk has focused on how to make action on climate change happen at a nebulous point in the future. Now, in large part thanks to the Paris Agreement, that action has already begun. And, while the international system is doomed to be defined by the least common denominator, many cities, states and businesses have stepped up to the challenge. In the months leading up to this conference, the World Bank committed $200 billion in climate investments, a slew of businesses lobbied for market solutions to climate change and alliances of sub-national governments in Japan, Argentina and Mexico joined the U.S. in making commitments to fill the gap in their national governments’ efforts.

“To combat climate change we need much much more than government,” says Laurence Tubiana, CEO of the European Climate Foundation and a central framer of the Paris Agreement. “It’s not for state only. It’s for society.”

The only issue is that none of this is moving fast enough. The IPCC report shows that temperatures have already risen 1°C as a result of human activity and that figure will surpass 1.5°C as early as 2030 without a dramatic shift in direction. A lot of work is necessary to facilitate such a shift. And that’s going to be a huge challenge so long as political tensions persist.

Write to Justin Worland at justin.worland@time.com.

 

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New high powered group to push for Paris Climate exit

 

“The Saltbush Club”

Skilled and Thinking Australians
concerned at the huge costs and unproven benefits
of the climate, energy and infrastructure policies
on both sides of Federal Parliament.

A high-powered group has been formed to get Australia out of the UN Paris Climate Agreement

A new lobby group comprising scientists, farmers, consumers, small business and big business is urging both sides of Australian politics to put aside party interests and global agendas to focus on what’s best for Australian business, workers, consumers and the environment.

The Saltbush Club calls for Australia to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement and to cease financing or supporting the international bodies promoting it.

It challenges the whole idea of a consensus on man-made global warming.

Jerry Ellis, retired chairman of BHP, and Founding Chairman of the Saltbush Club says:

“It is clear that Australia’s push to meet the Paris carbon dioxide emission targets is leading to higher electricity prices and unreliable supply. We have lost the balance between working for environmental outcomes and working for economic outcomes. These things need to be balanced, and this balance is missing with the Paris Agreement. The world would be a better placed with strong economies generating money to spend on poverty, health, infrastructure and the environment.”

Hugh Morgan, CEO of Western Mining 1990-2003 and a director of the Saltbush Club agrees:


“People think the Paris Accord is just about commitments to lower CO2. It is really about transferring wealth via the UN to the so-called Less Developed Countries. It’s about advancing centralised control of people’s lives on a global scale. This climate alarm movement has got so far because of backing by Western millennials who have been indoctrinated during their education. Enjoying living standards unprecedented in world history, they have embraced alarmism as a new secular religion.”


Ellis and Morgan are supported by a large, skilled and experienced group of other Australians calling themselves “The Saltbush Club”. The group was organised by Viv Forbes (with a few helpers), from a country farm-house in Queensland with no landline, no NBN and less than $3,000 in financial support.


 
“The Saltbush Club has over 200 foundation members, plus a bigger group of “silent” members. It will be a voice for those who are rarely heard in the climate and energy debate – those consumers of electricity who are concerned that the war on hydro-carbon energy has increased the costs and reduced the reliability of electricity for industry and private consumers,” said Mr Forbes.


“It welcomes anyone with a similar view, regardless of their political affiliations or leanings.


“We must reject the UN Agenda which is crippling western industry with high-cost unreliable electricity in a futile attempt to control global climate.”


“Our top priority is to have Australia withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement and to cease financing or supporting the international bodies promoting it.”


Jo Nova (a well-read blogger and Saltbush Media Director) added:


“Who speaks for consumers? Our elected reps are supposed to, but few are willing to speak up. There is a $1.5 trillion dollar global industry that wants Australia to accept Paris, but no debate about the vested interests that stand to profit while Australian consumers and businesses pay carbon taxes they have voted against every time they had the chance.”

 Viv Forbes
forbes@carbon-sense.com

Boonah


The Saltbush Club


Jerry Ellis                    Chairman        
ellisann3@gmail.com                         


Hugh Morgan                                      
hm@firstchar.com


Joanne Nova        Media Director         
joanne@joannenova.com.au


Ian Plimer                                           
ianplimer@internode.on.net


Viv Forbes       Executive Director        vforbes@clexit.net                            


Viv Forbes has a science degree and a long history in exploration, management, writing and lecturing in the exploration, mining and grazing industries of Northern Australia. He is currently self-employed with no ties to, interest in, or contracts with any company except for a long-held share-holding in Stanmore Coal which exports coking and some thermal coal to Asia.


For more information on the Saltbush Club see:

http://clexit.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/saltbush-introduction.pdf


http://clexit.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/saltbush-members.pdf


http://clexit.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/saltbush-skills.pdf


http://clexit.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/saltbush-priorities.pdf

 Other comments:

http://quadrant.org.au/opinion/doomed-planet/2018/09/ex-bhp-chief-scrap-paris-now/


https://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/climate/climate-economy-must-be-balanced-exlandcare-chair/news-story/85c456193704c061e517e6b090a2c93_

-contributed