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APRadio first episode by Peter Spencer exposing Government Theft of YOUR LAND

Peter Spencer

Peter Spencer

Harry Palmer introduces the first in a series of interviews with activist and true Australian patriot, Peter Spencer. Today we find out who Peter Spencer is and where he came from. In further episodes we will unravel the web of deceit woven by Australian governments to steal YOUR LAND….. it has gone people … and Peter will explain how this was done and is being carried out today. Peter has been in court for 10 years plus fighting the Goliath out of his own pocket while and army of QC’s and lawyers all paid for by YOU try to destroy him! Peter today still runs the gauntlet of courts armed only with his David slingshot to claim back the BILLIONS government stole from You the People …. Click here to listen

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Australia most over-governed and dearest country in world to live in

VALUABLE ADVICE FOR OUR MANY HUNDREDS OF INTERNATIONAL SUBSCRIBERS

ausflagAustralia, the most over-governed and excessively regulated country on earth may be the most expensive place to live but there are ways to keep your finances in order.

Here politicians from all three levels of government, pride themselves on how much legislation they can introduce in one parliamentary sitting.

Tourists and international business entrepreneurs are starting to steer clear Australia because of the excessive bureaucracy generated by Federal, State and Local Governments.

For example applications to start a mining venture can take more than three years just to get an approval. Try building houses, motels or accommodation units in a city or region and the bureaucracy will add 10 to 20 per cent to the project budget.

Environmental studies and native title take the cake, often adding years and hundreds of expensive, unnecessary and ridiculous conditions to a development application before, or if it is ever granted.

Native title is probably the greatest scam ever perpetuated on planning and land title issue approvals. Miners are not able to start exploration until a misnomer labeled an Indigenous Land Use Agreement is granted by supposed native title holders to the mining company. This can take between three to five years, but in some cases much longer.

Economically depressed and often disadvantaged ‘indigenous’ groups view an ILUA with a mining company as manna from heaven. The negotiations are stretched to the limit. Demands for a large cut of mining revenue or royalties, cultural heritage surveys, employment and housing are but a few of the normal requirements before land access is given.

Noble sentiments one would say, and so a (foreign) mining company should pay but in these days of the commodities depression, an ILUA can often make or break a project.

Employment agreements between indigenous communities and the mining industry usually stipulate that the workforce should comprise a minimum 30 per cent indigenous employees.

But onshore and offshore mining companies have been burnt by employment arrangements many times in the past. Mines always agree to hire a significant proportion of Aborigines, but every day experience shows work contracts, with only a few notable exceptions, fail before they start.

Most Aborigines want a job in a mine and eagerly participate in training programs, but when it comes to work on a daily or weekly roster, experience dictates a significant number of indigenous employees just do not turn up for work.

For those who have mining industry experience they well know when an employee fails to notify management of impending absenteeism, crew capabilities can be adversely affected, resulting in lower production, lower morale and safety issues.

aboriginal-flagThis indigenous cultural malady extends across the nation. For decades indigenous people have received government payments to attend funerals or cultural events in their communities. For most people attending a funeral, one day’s absence is all that is necessary. For some Aborigines it is usually a week, or in some cases they simply don’t return to work at all.

A recent experience with a large road construction project on Cape York Peninsula saw local indigenous employees down tools late one afternoon purportedly to attend a funeral the next day.

Insufficient notice was given to the construction manager to keep other contractors working. Coincidentally the indigenous cultural heritage observers departed on a Thursday afternoon, to give themselves a four day weekend, because the following Monday happened to be a public holiday.

As a consequence the $230 million project stalled because the cultural heritage management agreement forbade any machinery work without a $500 a day indigenous cultural heritage observer being present.

Never mind that in the previous 15 years of roadwork on Cape York Peninsula no cultural heritage observers have ever been required or present.

The lure of the largest road budget in recent history on Cape York, exposed the ‘gimmee gimmee’ cultural cringe of local governing bodies.

Governments of all hues have brought this dilemma upon themselves by pandering to militant indigenous organisations such as land councils and Prescribed Body Corporations.

Sydney and Melbourne rising out of reach

Yes, it’s true and not surprising: according to an annual world consumer price index1 Australia is the most expensive country to live in. These days it’s 12% more expensive than the United States, while India is the cheapest of the 19 countries examined.

A roof over your head is no longer a given in Australia, especially in Sydney, the 5th most expensive city in the world.

House prices at historic highsand almost five times the average household income of residents—are forcing some Sydney families to consider moving elsewhere2.

Melbourne residents live in the 8th most expensive major city with a burgeoning population pushing demand higher. While annually Sydney’s population has been increasing by 80,000 people, 95,000 are settling in Melbourne prompting demographers to predict Melbourne’s population will overtake Sydney’s by 20303.

More than rising property prices

Australians are feeling the pressure from more than just property prices. When it comes to basic goods and services the annual world consumer price index found the cost of living in Australia is more expensive than most other places.

Booking a room

Sydney is the most expensive when it comes to short-term accommodation. A five-star hotel room in Sydney is 232% of the cost of its New York counterpart whereas you’d pay just 72% in Melbourne.

Buying a drink

Two-litres of soft drink in Sydney will cost 51% moreand just 18% more in Melbournethan in the Big Apple. When it comes to beer, Sydney and Melbourne both offer better deals than New York. And as you might expect, Germany—at about half the price—is the place to raise your glass.

Shopping for clothes

You guessed it. Australians pay more than Americans whether it’s buying Adidas runners or a pair of Levi’s jeans. But we pay less than most Europeans for the same items.

Paying your fare

Getting from A to B is no laughing matter in Sydney. Public transport fares are higher than any other city in the world, with taxi fares 15% more expensive than New York’s.

Keeping fit

One thing cheaper in Sydney and Melbourne is gym membership. It’s about half the price of New York’s.

While Aussies’ living costs continue to rise it doesn’t mean building wealth is impossible. But it’s vital to get a handle on your finances by planning ahead and taking the pressure off.

Take the pressure off

If it’s all too much and you’re considering moving away from the big smoke, visit the Numbeo website where a cost of living calculator generates comparisons for everything from a café latte to a three-bedroom apartment.

1 Deutsche Bank, Mapping the World’s Prices 2015, http://pull.db-gmresearch.com/cgi-bin/pull/DocPull/17411-76F9/99524599/DB_RandomWalk_2015-04-14_0900b8c0898020b1.pdf

NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT WHITE PAPER SHREDDED BY CAPE YORK LAND COUNCIL

by Robert J Lee

LIBERAL GOVERNMENT LEFT WITH EGG ALL OVER ITS FACE

THE CAIRNS POST AND THE ABC HAVE HAD THIS STORY FOR 3 WEEKS BUT WILL NOT TOUCH IT

TROUBLE AHEAD FOR ALL RESIDENTS OF CAPE YORK PENINSULA WITH A NEW INDIGENOUS STATE TO BE CREATED

 Cape York Land Council takes control of the Peninsula Development Road on Cape York Peninsula.

Cape York Land Council says the $210 million Mein Deviation road job near Weipa can start

The prospect of Northern Development hailed by the Federal Government as the panacea for northern Australia has been placed on the back foot after the State Government and the Cape York Land Council signed an agreement allowing the Land Council to control the Peninsula Development Road, the main arterial access to Cape York.

The Land Council claims it wants jobs for local community residents but some Cape Traditional Owners, businessmen and pastoralists believe it to be a “greedy land grab for the few at the top of the CYLC” that will not benefit most struggling communities.

There will be more of the traditional CYLC ‘jobs for their boys’ who in most cases are never local indigenous businesses. Richie AhMat, Gerhardt and Noel Pearson are in bed with the big boys and their predictions of jobs for  Peninsula indigenous contractors like most of their other failed, expensive schemes will also fail local businesses, contractors and the long-suffering community resident.

gerhardt-pearson

Gerhart Pearson

Noel Peason

Noel Peason

ritchie

Ritchie AhMat

The state and federal governments have rolled over to the unrepresentative CYLC yet again. Next comes the new Aboriginal state of Cape York above the 16th Parallel with the TOLL gates set at Laura or Lakeland.

 

Every local authority in the nation should be terrified about the hijacking of this vital state government-owned road that is the only land access to important northern defence facilities and the major mining town of Weipa.

Meanwhile September is a few days away and the wet season a few months away.  Starting such major roadworks near Weipa that should have begun in May will be a disaster for the unlucky contractor, soon to be announced.

And the annual $25 billion Aboriginal industry, taxpayer feeding frenzy continues for CYLC and Balkanu…….. 

Meetings to discuss Cape York issues to be held soon

flyer-1A series of meetings about the Penisula Development Road will be held next week across Cape York Peninsula.

Contact: info@cyfs.com.au – (07) 40532856

Meeting Dates:

Cooktown Monday 3rd August 5.30pm – 7pm Sovereign Resort

Coen Hotel Wednesday 5th August 4.00pm – 5.30pm

Lakeland Hotel Monday 3rd August  2.00pm – 3.30pm

Laura Tuesday 4th August 10am – 11.30am Quinkan Hotel

Lockhart River Church Hall Tuesday 11th August 10am – 12.30pm

Loyalty beach camp ground and fishing lodge Friday 7th August 5.30pm – 7pm

Musgrave Roadhouse Tuesday 4th August 3.30pm – 5pm

Weipa Albatross Bay Resort Tuesday 6th August 5.30pm – 7pm

Warren-EntschIt would seem Federal Member for Leichhardt, Warren Entsch has been fence sitting over this issue and continues to ignore the voice of the people. He may have started his own political demise with voter anger reaching boiling point in North Queensland.

FACEBOOK PUBLICATION

Gerhardt Pearson Facebook Source:    https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009743923034

 Landmark agreement paves way for Peninsula Development Road

Published on Facebook – 29 July 2015

THE Cape York Land Council today signed an important agreement which paves the way for the start of construction on the Mein Deviation and other sections of the Peninsula Development Road, known as the PDR.

Under this agreement, the Queensland Government and Native Title Holders will now begin negotiations to settle an Indigenous Land Use Agreement for the whole of the PDR by the end of 2015. These negotiations follow the lodgment and registration of one of Australia’s largest native title claims earlier in the year, over Cape York.

Chairman of the Cape York Land Council, Mr Richie Ah Mat, said the Department of Transport and Main Roads could now finalise contract arrangements for construction to commence next week.

“There has been a mammoth effort by the Queensland Government and the Cape York Land Council to settle these outstanding matters over the last two months and our meetings over the last two days have endorsed our approach,” he said.

The agreement addresses Indigenous employment, training and business opportunities, cultural heritage clearance processes and environmental considerations.

“On Cape York, where the Indigenous community is battling very high unemployment, high incarceration rates and alcohol and drug abuse, projects such as the PDR are critical in providing opportunity to our mob,” said Mr Ahmat.

“This is a great example of the State Government recognising the Native Title and cultural interests of Traditional Owners to maintain respectful ongoing relationships to carry the PDR to completion.”

Under the agreement, a Traditional Owner steering committee has been established that will guide the settlement of the Indigenous Land Use Agreement with the Queensland Government.

Mr Ahmat said that it was very important for Traditional Owner groups to work together on major linear projects such as the PDR. “An important principle of the Native Title claim has been that Traditional Owners speak for their country,” he said.

“Prior to the settlement of the Indigenous Land Use Agreement, there will need to be further discussions with Traditional Owners from along the road route”.

Southern Kandju and Negotiating committee member, Dion Creek, praised the agreement.

“For the first time, the State Labor Government, Cape York Land Council, and Traditional Owners have respectfully negotiated a single agreement covering the PDR,” he said.

“There can be no longer be any excuse for our people to remain on the sidelines, when it comes to capitalising on investments for the PDR and other road networks throughout Cape York.

Mr Creek said that PDR investments specified in the agreement would be used to increase the capacity of Indigenous people, through the provision of training and employment, enterprise facilitation and the commitment to support local business.

“We have a jobs crisis in Cape York,” he said. “It is a priority we must address

land-council-signing