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Military Police exercise with police unsettling Charters Towers residents

by Jim O’Toole, Townsville bureau

Armed Military Police and Queensland police could have started their vaxx passport warm-up exercises with road blocks in Charters Towers (west of Townsville) today stopping vehicles, checking driver’s licences and doing breath analysis tests.

Charters Towers people have become unnerved about a large military and police presence in their town, in light of a megalomaniacal, socialist Queensland Premier and a hopelessly inept Prime Minister

Two M113AS4 Armoured Personnel Carriers are positioned on York Street, one facing east at 30 degrees towards Townsville and the other west towards Hughenden at the same angle.

Police and  Alpha Company 1st Military Police Battalion are pulling over passing vehicles and directing them into the cricket centre presumably for ID checks and breath tests.

Local residents have been ringing local Member of Parliament Robbie Katter and complaining about the MP’s carrying rifles with regular cops on the beat, claiming such an exercise for a week in a country town is unacceptable.

Residents have been warned of urban warfare exercises and gunfire in the surrounding hills and countryside tonight.

Operation ‘Stability’ is being conducted in the North Queensland Town of Charters Towers. Residents have been asking what needs to be stabilised?

Military sources said it was unusual for MP’s to become involved in traffic duties with police and unheard of for MP’s to be doing breath analyses of civilians.

The Military ran a small article in the Townsville Bulletin and Charters Towers local newspaper warning of the exercise a week ago, which it seems few residents have read.

A spokesman for the ADF said the activities will help soldiers prepare to support the civil community within a “stability” environment should they ever be required and all involved are grateful to the Charters Towers community for its support and understanding.

Other military sources said the exercise could be a warm-up for checking vaccine status of all motorists after the Queensland Premier’s planned lock down of un-vaxxed people on December 18.

Specifications of APC M113AS4

Weight: 18,000 kilograms 
Length: 6.00 metres 
Width: 2.69 metres 
Height: 2.61 metres 
Crew: Two – with up to ten passengers

Engine: MTU 6 V 199 TE 20 
Speed: 66 kilometres per hour 
Operational range: 550 kilometres 
Armament: 12.7 millimetre M2HB QCB Machine Gun

Watch out for rabies-infected flying foxes

State KAP Leader and Traeger MP Robbie Katter has implored human health and safety be prioritised, calling for the potentially life-saving treatments given to anyone scratched or bitten by a flying fox to be readily available in flying fox hotspots.

 Mr Katter wrote to Townsville Hospital Health Service chief executive Kieran Keyes after a concerning incident on December 26, 2018, whereby a 12-year-old Charters Towers boy was scratched in a local park.

Flying foxes are in plague proportions in north Queensland causing incalculable damage to fruit crops and infecting humans and horses with rabies.

 The boy was initially seen at the Charters Towers Hospital but was later sent to Townsville where he was treated with rabies immuno-globulin and a course of rabies vaccine in order to prevent the Australian Bat Lyssavirus.

 Following this media reports were circulated that the boy had to travel to Townsville because the treatments were not readily available at the Charters Towers Hospital.

 The THHS released a social media statement saying rural hospitals like Charters Towers had the rabies vaccine, while the rabies immunoglobulin was stored at the Townsville Hospital and could be couriered out within 48 hours, or the patient could go and get it in Townsville.

 Mr Katter said this just wasn’t good enough.

“Charters Towers’ issues with flying foxes are long and documented,” he said.

 “For a long time the State Government’s attitude to helping us deal with the flying foxes has been to create awareness of any of the health risk they pose.

 “I am very aware of how dangerous the Australian Bat Lyssavirus can be and also know that following a scratch or bite, every hour delay in getting those vaccines administered is a risk.”

 Mr Katter said while it was estimated only around 1 per cent of flying foxes carried the virus, this was large number when you considered the plague proportions they were in at times in Charters Towers.

 “Just over a year ago we had 200,000 bats in the centre and across the town – that could be 20,000 bats carrying a deadly virus in extremely close proximity to people and their homes,” he said.

 “I don’t intend to be alarmist, but it is common sense to me that, in rural places like Charters Towers and Ingham where bat populations are high, these vaccines should be available on the ground.

 “If it is a matter of budget, then the State Government needs to make sure it is providing enough funding to cover any costs that the hospitals accumulate to ensure these treatments are available when and where they are needed.”

 

New age of road surveillance snares innocent drivers in Queensland

big-brotherWhile far northern motorists have been discussing and complaining about a greatly increased traffic police presence on highways, the former Queensland LNP Government ensured the game was sewn up, with no escape.

Contractors with roadside cameras and cameras fitted to all highway patrol cars are busily recording your every move sending images of your vehicle and in some cases its occupants to a massive data bank held by the Main Roads Department and police.

The cameras record the registration number, speed, time, date and direction of a vehicle whenever it passes a camera.

Well that’s probably not such a bad thing, some motorists reckon, “why I don’t have anything to hide”, said a Cairns truck driver.

It does seem rather innocuous, and after all motorists have been exposed to mobile radar speed devices for many years.

The new age of surveillance by Big Brother has been in full swing since the former state government abolished car registration stickers, to save a measly few million dollars when the Treasury is raking in more than six million dollars a week in traffic fines.

speed-cam-qld

 

Cairns News recently interviewed a Townsville builder who had a very disturbing story to tell about state government surveillance that he got caught up in October last year.

He was completely unaware that he had been on “police radar” for some weeks.

The consequences of this roadside spying could have cost him his livelihood,   yet he broke no laws in pursuit of his occupation.

We will call the builder Mike.

His story:

Mike,42, is a normal hard-working ‘chippie’ who owns a four wheel drive utility and a work trailer in which he carries his tools of trade and a few personal belongings.

He lives close to Townsville with his family and often works in remote parts of western Queensland.

His work requires him to do a lot of driving, returning home after working at townships like Hughenden, Julia Creek or Pentland, a comfortable distance from his base.

Sometimes he has to drive to Townsville during the week to buy building materials, normally unavailable in smaller towns.

He was returning from Townsville with a load of materials for a job when he was intercepted by police at a roadblock west of Charters Towers.

Present at the parking bay were several Main Roads Department inspectors and traffic police checking truckies’ work diaries, licences, vehicle roadworthiness and conducting drug and alcohol tests.

Well, again such an offensive is probably in the interests of road safety, motorists would claim.

Mike’s vehicle was searched by over-zealous constables, starting with his trailer.

“The young coppers pulled everything out of the trailer and tossed my valuable electric tools into the very dusty ground,” Mike said.

“I was a little upset because there were thousands of dollars of equipment that I depend on for my job.

“I asked the cop to be careful and he looked like he was about to bash me.

“The situation got worse when they started on my car and then they were about to pull all the frozen stuff out of my car fridge.

“I got really angry because before they started I told them I had nothing illegal in my car.

“Fortunately a senior officer appeared and told the young cops to stop and leave me alone.”

The conversation Mike then had with this officer shocked the easy going tradie father of three.

Mike asked the officer why his car was being searched and why he had been picked out of a large number of vehicles stopped on the roadside.

“The copper said I had been on their radar for a while because I often travel between Townsville and the west and they wanted to check me out,” Mike said.

“He told me they had lots of photos of my car passing the fixed camera at Woodstock and from other cameras in Townsville and they thought I was selling drugs.

“I told him I was a tradie and often had to go to Townsville for materials and they knew my movements because he said I was spending too much time on the road and would have been tired.

“He said if I had an accident because I was tired the insurance company could get the camera information and possibly not pay out any damages.

“I said I drove no more than five hours at a time and do not drive when I am tired.”

The Main Roads Department has advised Cairns News:

“The fixed roadside cameras on Flinders Highway, near Woodstock, are Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) cameras. 

We use this state-of-the-art technology to collect information about travel patterns of vehicles using the road.  

The cameras take an image of all passing vehicles. 

Infra-red cameras and illuminators are used to automatically capture the registration number, date and time of passing vehicles, providing statistical data on travel times, volumes and vehicle types.  

ANPR cameras are strategically placed at key locations to provide:

  • Journey time,
  • Congestion information,
  • Origin and destination information, and
  • To monitor the use of the network by heavy vehicles. 

Collected data helps us understand vehicle movements, plan for future improvements and achieve efficient control and management of the road network. 

The cameras are also used to detect unregistered and uninsured vehicles. 

Only authorised officers, including Queensland Police and TMR Transport Inspectors are able to access information from the ANPR cameras where an offence is suspected.”

This covert surveillance of law-abiding drivers heralds a new age of motoring in Queensland.

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You have been warned.

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