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There are 1.8 million people looking for work in Australia; immigration rate is unsustainable

by the ABC and Cairns News

Net migration of 245,400

Australia’s immigration rate has become unsustainable now that 1000 additional people entered the country each day up to June 2017.

Treasurer Scott Morrison is correct when he says there were 371,000 new jobs created over the past year.

Australia’s population swelled by 388,000 in the year until June — which is more than 1,000 people being added to our population every day.

However, it doesn’t necessarily make life any better for the people who live in the country and arguably, makes it a lot worse.

This is more people competing for jobs and housing, pushing down wages and pushing up property prices.

Australia’s population growth is extraordinarily high when compared to our global peers, at 1.6 per cent per year.

This is more than double the rate of the US, nearly three times the rate of the UK, and four times the rate of France.

On current projections, Australia will hit 38 million people by 2050.

This high rate of population growth is driven mostly by high immigration.

Middle Eastern migrants are piling on to the dole queue — with a 33 per cent jobless rate during their first five years in Australia. The Labor, Liberals and Greens are doing what that Fabian sycophant Bob Hawke did in the 80’s – importing potential voters

Net migration was 245,400 people over the past 12 months — which was a 27.1 per cent increase over the year before.

That’s more than the total population of Hobart in new migrants coming to the country in a single year.

Worse still, a large number of the migrants indentify as Muslim, unbalancing the nation’s Christian foundation and way of life.

The simple economic rule of supply and demand means these new workers effectively lower the price of labour, which means lower wages.

A huge intake of new workers makes economic sense if you don’t have enough workers in order to do the jobs you need to get done. But with 700,000 in the unemployment ranks already, we simply don’t need these migrants.

Immigration has been the foundation of Australia’s economic growth, so what would happen if we “close the door”? questions Ian Verrender.

It also makes sense to run a real skilled migration program in order to attract the talent you can’t train yourself.

For example, at the height of the mining investment boom, attracting talent from overseas made sense in many occupations to allow projects to be built.

Although be careful when talking about ‘skill shortages’. Often it isn’t a case of there not being enough people with those skills.

Instead, it’s a case of businesses not being willing to pay enough money to attract people and thus choosing to sponsor foreigners who will work for worse pay and conditions arriving on 457 and holiday visas.

Then to add insult to injury the Liberal Party Government slapped those back packers and overseas workers with a 15 per cent income tax. Previously they worked in the farming industry without paying any tax at all.

Farmers objected strongly saying crops would be left in paddocks to rot, because the majority backpacker workforce would not come to Australia for a working holiday on farms.

Consequently a group representing foreign backpackers has taken the government to court over what it says is an unfair tax.

Raw deal for Australian workers, where are the unions and the ALP?

Australia is not currently anywhere near full employment.

At 5.4 per cent unemployment, Australia is well above the US which is sitting at 4.1 per cent and the UK at 4.2 per cent.

There are currently 707,000 unemployed Australians. These are people actually looking for work.

But that’s only part of the story as there are currently about 1.1 million Australians who are ‘underemployed’.

These are people who are currently working (perhaps as little as one hour a week) but want to work more hours.

So the number of Australians currently looking for more work is 1.8 million.

There is still a huge amount of ‘slack’ in the labour market which is keeping people from getting a decent pay rise.

Companies are much less likely to offer big pay rises to workers if they know there’s a big supply of other workers who are desperate for a job or more hours.

What’s really worrying, is despite the Government crowing about creating ‘1,000 jobs a week’, there are only 20,000 less unemployed Australians than there were a year ago.

The economic ‘growth’ hasn’t made a sizeable difference to the amount of Australians unemployed and has left us with the worst wages growth since the 1960s.

Cattle and sheep turn the desert green

by Viv Forbes

People send me things; lots of things – compliments, abuse, information and advice.

One correspondent is “Coochie” a wannabee grass-farmer who lives in town but reads all the latest stuff on managing grazing animals. He reads things like “Mother Earth” and “Stockman Grass Farmer”.

Coochie recently rebuked me.

“Please tell Farmer Fred that grazing animals are far better than ‘carbon neutral’. In fact they are the only hope for reversing desertification of the world’s grasslands and open forests. If managed properly, grazing herds will remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, reduce soil erosion, improve soil fertility and increase vegetative cover. They should earn ‘carbon credits’.”

I was all ears.

“You and Fred should study the work of Allan Savory. Allan is an observant honest ecologist who has spent his life worrying about desertification, which can be both a cause and a result of climate change. Initially, he hated grazing animals – he thought they were causing desertification and destroying his beloved wildlife.

“But a life-time of study of the whole system showed him it was neither the cloven hooves nor the animal numbers that caused desertification. The problem was how they grazed – how long, how intense. When hard-hoof animals are concentrated on small areas of land for short periods of time, they break up the hard crust and cover it with litter, dung and seeds. Then, when the herd moves on to seek new clean pastures, the abandoned areas recover quickly with improved soil and replanted pasture. This process restores the health of grasses and soil, returning much life-supporting carbon to the soil in the process.

“What turns grasslands into deserts is constant grazing by a few animals. Herds must be concentrated and moving.”

I insisted that Fred come over and listen to Alan Savory:
After he listened to it, Fred was stunned. He was always sceptical of our “funny ideas” on rotational grazing but suddenly he understood.

“Well, my boy” he said. “So much for all that rot from your Professor mate attacking us graziers and lauding soft-footed animals. It makes sense – soft-footed rabbits spread everywhere and destroyed everything with their constant nibbling; but one or two massive moving herds of bison, bunched and harassed by wolves and Indians and assisted by occasional fires, created the marvellous grasslands of the Prairies.

“Our cattle and sheep can be much more than grass harvesters and providers of periodic protein for people and predators. They can cultivate soil, prepare seed beds, spread seeds and mulch, and fertilise our grasslands and pastures in just one pass; but only if we concentrate them properly, and then give the pasture a decent rest-and-recovery period.”

“This Un-Savory chap will probably be expelled from the Deep Green Brotherhood for such blasphemy.”

Here is the climate shocker: “Rising CO2 is turning the world’s deserts GREEN”:
Moreover “Abundant Carbon Dioxide plays a Crucial Role for soil fertility and plant health”:

Coochie was ecstatic: “With plenty of plant-sustaining emissions from coal in the skies, and soil-sustaining emissions from cattle in the soils, then coal and cattle can paint the grasslands green again.”

viv-forbes-green-pastures

 Cartoon credit: http://stevehunterillustrations.com.au/political-cartoons/

www.carbon-sense.com
12 Sept 2015

Paris climate –fest(ering)
Make sure Australia’s delegates to the climate-fest in Paris in December get this message:

“Sign No binding Agreement in Paris
and put a ‘Get Out’ clause on anything proposed”.

This conference is NOT about climate or pollution – it is about world government and redistribution of wealth and power to UN agencies:
http://joannenova.com.au/2015/09/flashback-ipcc-official-admits-un-climate-meetings-redistribute-wealth-largest-economic-conference-since-wwii/

Disclosure:
Viv Forbes has spent many years working in the mining, exploration, coal, oil, gas, cattle and sheep industries of Australia as well as in government service. He is a non-executive director and minor shareholder of a small Australian coal exploration company (which was founded after the Carbon Sense Coalition was founded), but he and his wife spend most of their time and energy raising meat sheep and beef cattle on natural grasslands. He was the founder of the Carbon Sense Coalition, which receives no encouragement or direction from Big Government, Big Coal, Big Oil, Big Green or Big Unions.

Australia’s Secret War

The Enemy Within

Julia GillardBill Shorten

 

Aust-secret-warAs the Abbott government begins to take on union power and corruption and the recent Royal Commission exposing Union liars, thugs & thieves, a timely new book reveals the union movement’s role in one of the most shameful periods of Australian history. What the wharfies did to Australian troops – and their nation’s war effort – between 1939 and 1945 is nothing short of an abomination.

Perth lawyer Hal Colebatch has done the nation a service with his groundbreaking book, Australia’s Secret War, telling the untold story of union bastardry during World War 2.

Using diary entries, letters and interviews with key witnesses, he has pieced together with forensic precision the tale of how Australia’s unions sabotaged the war effort; how wharfies vandalised, harassed, and robbed Australian troop ships, and probably cost lives.

One of the most obscene acts occurred in October, 1945, at the end of the war, after Australian soldiers were released from Japanese prison camps. They were half dead, starving and desperate for home. But when the British aircraft-carrier HMS Speaker brought them into Sydney Harbour, the wharfies went on strike. For 36 hours, the soldiers were forced to remain on-board, tantalisingly close to home. This final act of cruelty from their countrymen was their thanks for all the sacrifice.

Colebatch coolly recounts outrage after outrage. There were the radio valves pilfered by waterside workers in Townsville which prevented a new radar station at Green Island from operating. So when American dive bombers returning from a raid on a Japanese base were caught in an electrical storm and lost their bearings, there was no radio station to guide them to safety. Lost, they ran out of fuel and crashed, killing all 32 airmen.

Colebatch quotes RAAF serviceman James Ahearn, who served at Green Island, where the Australians had to listen impotently to the doomed Americans’ radio calls: “The grief was compounded by the fact that had it not been for the greed and corruption on the Australian waterfront such lives would not have been needlessly lost.”

Almost every major Australian warship was targeted throughout the war, with little intervention from an enfeebled Prime Minister Curtin. There was the deliberate destruction by wharfies of vehicles and equipment, theft of food being loaded for soldiers, snap strikes, go-slows, demands for “danger money” for loading biscuits.

Then there were the coal strikes which pushed down coal production between 1942 and 1945 despite the war emergency. There were a few honourable attempts to resist union leaders, such as the women working in a small arms factory in Orange, NSW, who refused to strike and “pelted union leaders with tomatoes and eggs”.

This is a tale of the worst of Australia amid the best, the valour and courage of our soldiers in New Guinea providing our last line of defence against Japanese, only to be forced onto starvation rations and to “go easy on the ammo” because strikes by the wharfies back home prevented supplies from reaching them. A planned rescue of Australian POWs in Borneo late in the war apparently had to be abandoned, writes Colebatch, because a wharf strike in Brisbane meant the ships had no heavy weapons.

There was no act too low for the unionists. For instance, in 1941, hundreds of soldiers on board a ship docked in Fremantle entrusted personal letters to wharfies who offered to post them in return for beer money. The letters never arrived.

At one point in 1942 a US Army colonel became so frustrated at the refusal of Townsville wharfies to load munitions unless paid quadruple time, he ordered his men to throw the unionists into the water and load the guns themselves.

In Adelaide, American soldiers fired sub-machine guns at wharfies deliberately destroying their aircraft engines by dropping them from great heights. Australian soldiers had to draw bayonets to stop the same Adelaide wharfies from stealing food meant for troops overseas. You will read this book with mounting fury.

Colebatch offers various explanations for the treasonous behaviour of the unions. Many of the leaders were Communists obsessed with class warfare. Fervent “identity politics” led them to believe they were victims, and that servicemen and women were “puppets of capitalism whose lives were of no consequence”.

Contrary to popular belief, strikes and sabotage continued to the end of the war, even after the Soviet Union became an ally, writes Colebatch, who contends that the Australian Left may have wanted to undermine the military in preparation for revolution after the war. Whatever the reasons for the defective morality of those unionists who sabotaged our war effort, the traitors have never been brought to account.

This story has been largely suppressed for 70 years because Labor and the Left have successfully controlled the narrative of history. But no more, thanks to Colebatch.

 

Book Purchase Links:

Cost: $44.95

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