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Busting the ‘poor blackfella me’ myth

Aboriginal Australians are riding on the gravy train and based on 2016* figures released by the Productivity Commission, state and federal governments spent $33.4 billion on the indigenous industry for that year.

This equates to $44,886 for every Aborigine and Torres Strait Islander, or at least people claiming to be indigenous, compared to $22,356 each for non-indigenous citizens across the 150 expenditure categories.

https://www.pc.gov.au/research/ongoing/indigenous-expenditure-report/2017/ier-2017-indigenous-expenditure-report.pdf

Whatever way it is looked at, putting aside the crescendo of racist screams from the pseudo indigenous mob marching in the streets demanding more taxpayers money, indigenous people are twice as well off compared to non-indigenous in financial terms.

Indigenous Australians plundering the public purse get twice as much as non-indigenous

If we take Cape York Peninsula, home to about 5000 Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, their living conditions are exactly what they choose.

The 14 isolated Peninsula and Gulf local government communities have more than double per capita spent on them than the rest of Australia. There they have well-funded government programs of every shape and size which have been ongoing for more than 40 years.

There are many thousands of government bureaucrats, quangos and NGO staff running these programs which are in the hundreds and too many to publish in this format, even if we could find all of them.

Housing and health consume much of the total annual budget. There are a dozen Aboriginal and Islander health organisations with offices in Cairns and every remote community including the Torres Strait. They operate large fleets of cars and buses all assigned with fuel cards.

The federal government is spending $4 billion over the next four years on the Indigenous Australian Health Program.

Another $90 million for primary health care was committed on July 1.

Indigenous Healthcare services for Queensland cost the taxpayer $1, 670.9 billion in 2016.

The hospitals and clinics in these communities are equipped with the latest medical equipment and staffed by well-trained black and white nurses and doctors.

There are five Queensland Ambulance Service bases across the Peninsula boasting some of the best trained staff in the country.

Royal Flying Doctor Service aircraft and doctors are continually servicing Aboriginal communities across the north, running regular clinics and transporting injured or sick patients to Cairns Base hospital on a daily basis.

A festering point of contention among Cape York residents is priority of patients for medical emergencies.

Although the Royal Flying Doctor Service will not admit it, pastoralists and other inhabitants claim Aborigines get priority over them for emergency medical evacuation flights.

Perhaps flights are prioritised on a financial basis? Which patient attracts the best contribution?

Housing for remote communities between 2008 and 2018 cost taxpayers more than $1 billion.

An election promise of another $105 million is expected to roll out over the next 12 months for remote northern indigenous housing.

The building industry benefits greatly from housing construction across the north where the average cost of a three bedroom dwelling is about $600,000. This does not include land.

In spite of continual drug and alcohol induced rioting at the Aurukun Aboriginal community, which saw six of these expensive homes burnt down last year, the capitulating Queensland Government is busy rebuilding them at great expense. These dwellings could easily be burnt down again in the ongoing warfare among the five community tribes.

Nationally, Indigenous Education and Training expenditure for the 2016 financial year was $5.776 billion, with Queensland’s share in 2016 costing $1,463.5 billion.

Every northern indigenous community has a modern school which is the envy of every teacher outside of the Far North. Technology has not been spared in these schools and most indigenous students, that is those who attend, are whiz-kids when it comes to mobile phone and internet ability.

The federal government in response to the Covid 19 destruction of the national economy is paying the displaced workforce of more than one million employees $1500 per fortnight to sit on their bums at home.

Dole payments have been doubled from $540 a fortnight to more than $1000 a fortnight which has provided a booze bonanza for many Aborigines lounging around on their boasted “sit down money.”

Is it any wonder most industries and farmers cannot get employees back to work?

Those who cry “poor blackfella me” should crawl back under their rocks.

* Latest figures available