Blog Archives

Borderforce, navy and army step up patrols in Torres Strait to keep out Covid and swine fever

Border patrols in the Torres Strait have been stepped up after Port Moresby yesterday was struck with 52 Covid 19 infections forcing the city into lockdown for 14 days.
Senior doctors said the base hospital would be unable to cope with any more cases and have begun establishing a temporary clinic to deal with an expected rush of Covid 19 patients.
Borderforce and the Australian Navy have increased patrols across the top of Torres Strait near Sabai Island from where the PNG mainland can be seen.

Papuans have been visiting northern Australia shores for centuries making it difficult for Borderforce to police this cultural practice

For decades Papuans and Islanders have been visiting the mainland and this tradition is making it difficult for Borderforce and the navy to prevent incursions by Papuans in tinnies or canoes.
Compounding the Covid outbreak is the reported incidence of African swine fever in PNG. In March Department of Primary Industries inspectors travelled to Port Moresby to monitor cases found in domestic pigs.
In June the army stationed 50 regular soldiers at the ADF barracks in Bamaga to patrol the northern coastline assisted by drones flying from Bamaga Airport.
Soldiers are maintaining regular patrols throughout the far north. During exercises throughout the islands earlier this year local inhabitants and  reservists themselves complained they were not allowed to bring their Steyr rifles or other armaments while on active duty.
It is not known if the present detachment of regular soldiers is armed.
Last week infrared equipped drones discovered in one of the many bays a drum of chemical compound used in the manufacturing of the dangerous drug, ice.

Member for Leichardt Warren Entsch said humanitarian food drops are being made to southern PNG villages  and a new medical clinic is being established in an effort to stem the flow of Papuans to the Australian mainland and islands sourcing staples and medical assistance.

He said any villagers trying to access islands or the mainland for family visits would be turned back.

One of two Borderforce vessels regularly patrolling the Torres Strait

On Thursday Cape York Peninsula pastoralists reported seeing eight travellers of Chinese appearance driving north on the Peninsula Development Road.
The drivers of the eight four wheel drives were the sole occupants with two of the vehicles having back-up equipment and the others empty.
The observers said the vehicles were “quite well kept and shiny and could have been hire cars.”
Their movements were reported to Norforce and Queensland Police.

Australia arms up ready to fight China in South China Sea with US

Tindal Airforce Base at Katherine in the Northern Territory gets $1.3 billion for runway extension.

 

 

Australian military has just 19 days of reserve fuel supplies

No government-mandated strategic reserve supply of fuel

by staff writers

A former army Chief turned senator has warned that the Liberal and Labor policies of turning Australia into a service nation could leave us vulnerable to attack from near neighbours.

The loss of any ability to manufacture on a medium scale, basic motor vehicles, parts or advanced weaponry and the inaction of government over a mandatory fuel reserve storage plan could halt any prolonged military protection for the nation by our troops.

Free trade has sounded the death knell for most Australian industries and the petroleum refining industry is no exception.

The Australian Institute of Petroleum says the domestic context of high operating costs, ageing facilities, increasing sea miles for the transport of crude to the refineries, shallow berths that are not suitable for large crude carriers, increasing technical complexity needed for refining of the broad range of crude oil and the high Australian dollar, put Australia at a competitive disadvantage, resulting in the closure of some domestic refineries that are no longer commercially competitive.

The Australian army, air force or navy will be unable to defend our shores for more than 19 days due to oil refineries closing and no mandatory fuel reserve policy

Jim Molan was the chief of operations for coalition forces in Iraq and will enter the senate next month, replacing former deputy Nationals leader Fiona Nash who was forced out due to dual citizenship.

He has issued a stark warning about Australia’s readiness for war, saying the armed forces could be ineffective within 19 days if current stockpiles of petrol, diesel and aviation fuel run dry.

“We are almost unique throughout the world in that we don’t have a government-mandated strategic reserve of fuel,” Senator Molan said.

“There are things that we can probably never build in this country, such as the Joint Strike Fighter and the most advanced missiles,” he continued.

“But we should guarantee their delivery to Australia — which you can rarely do — or we should have them in warehouses.

“Unless we have a plan to get them when we need them … then I, as an ex-military commander, wouldn’t want to cross the start line in doing something militarily unless I had those warehouses behind me.”

The 2016 Defence White Paper warned Australia’s dependency on fuel imports was a risk given tensions in the South China Sea, which is a major shipping route.

US military assistance not guaranteed

Senator Molan has also warned that military support from the US is not guaranteed and the Federal Government needs to be more prepared.

Major General Jim Molan soon to enter the senate warns Australia has only 19 days of reserve fuel for military supplies and that the US can no longer be relied on for military assistance

“Australia should be thinking about the level of defence expenditure that we are prepared to commit ourselves if America was the centre pole of our defence policy and now may not be as strong as it once was,” Senator Molan said.

Senator Molan said US Defence Secretary James Mattis has raised concerns about the readiness of the US military’s readiness for war.

“That should be ringing bells all over the world,” Senator Molan said.

Half of Australia’s fuel is imported- five refineries left

The Petroleum Institute has thrown its weight behind imported fuel claiming the closure of the refineries will not lead to negative price outcomes for consumers. Australian fuel prices reflect an import parity price, which is the price in international markets.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission was clear in its advice to the API committee that as a result of import parity pricing, the retail price for petrol is not impacted by refinery closures.

Australia can source its liquid fuel needs from a diversity of sources so that if one source becomes unavailable other sources can meet demand according to the committee report.

Following the closure of the Clyde and Kurnell oil refineries, refinery capacity in Australia will decrease about 28 per cent and leave five operating refineries.

The Frigate, HMAS Darwin conducts maritime surveillance patrols off the coast of Western Australia 

Domestic refiners will produce just over half the fuel consumed in Australia with the remainder being imported. Consequently, concerns have been raised about the viability of Australia’s oil refinery industry, and the potential impacts of declining domestic refinery capacity on the economy, energy security and employment in the sector.

The most pessimistic view was that this is the beginning of the end of Australian refining, and the most optimistic view was that there is a future for Australian refining, albeit under increasing competitive pressure.

The committee noted that during the last decade the oil industry has invested over $9 billion in its Australian refineries.

The Liberal and Labor free trade mantra has all but destroyed our once great manufacturing base. No cars, no parts,  no tyres, no fuel, no white goods, no military aeroplanes, no guns, only minute amounts of ammo, no boots, clothing or equipment for the military. All of it is imported.