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Looney Greens try to stifle Hanson’s speech about corruption in the Aboriginal industry

by Senator Pauline Hanson

Today I attempted to use my Senate time to have the issue of the abuse and corruption that is rife in the indigenous industry debated in the Senate.

Sadly, the Greens decided to use every procedural trick in the book to run down the clock and silence debate, as you will see if you watch this video.

This is an important issue that has been swept under the rug by all sides of politics for too long.

It’s a shame that there are those in other parties who are too afraid to hear the truth about what is going on.

You can read my prepared remarks in full below. This is what the Greens didn’t want you to be able to hear.

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Pauline Hanson says it’s time to get some accountability in the annual $35 billion Aboriginal industry

I rise to bring to the attention of Senators and the people of Australia, yet again, the inequality that exists in the funding of Indigenous programs and the continuing desperate circumstances of the victims of this financial bastardry and mismanagement.

I learned of this in my many conversations over the years with indigenous communities across Australia.

Unlike many vocal urban aboriginal elites, I have walked through the streets of remote Aboriginal communities in Queensland, the Northern Territory, South Australia and Western Australia.

And I’ve listened.

And I understand.

Whether it’s sitting on the beach with Mullawop on Thursday Island or Jimpoona and her family at the base of Uluru. Just being in remote communities listening to elders and residents have been profound and very informative. There’s not one indigenous community I’ve met with that isn’t concerned and they want to share what’s going wrong.

A lot of these people can’t even gain access to their own land which has in many cases been given back to the registered native title bodies corporate which are often more restrictive than the government was.

Many of these Bodies, especially in more remote areas are highly restrictive to the detriment of the aboriginal people.

Some are charged to go on their ancestral land or worse still some are denied access altogether.

But those conversations in both the large communities and in remote locations, always turn to the needs that their isolation and situation brings.

  • Needs reflected in a lack of adequate housing,
  • A deficiency of infrastructure,
  • Widespread alcoholism,
  • Out-of-control levels of domestic violence,
  • Repeated sexual abuse – including of young children,
  • And a lack of effective pathways to escape the cycles of poverty and

unemployment that are often normalised and passed on from

generation to generation.

Those communities live on the other side of what the highly respected Indigenous spokesperson, Jacinta Price, referred to in the Australian newspaper recently as ‘the kasm’.

She described in detail how the aboriginal elite, the activists, the academics from the indoctrination centres posing as universities, those with their hands out for grant money, those with the loudest voices who want to change the date of Australia Day – they all live in the city – on their side of the kasm.

When was the last time you heard one of the members of the Elite in this place saying anything positive or uplifting about indigenous achievements? When was the last time you heard one of the activists who identifies as indigenous talk up the efforts of those in remote locations working to succeed?

The Elites, the truth deniers, they know there’s a multitude of ways to end the misery.

They know there’s a ton of money being poured into programs.

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