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Sign this petition to stop a cashless society

More signatures are needed for this petition to Treasurer Josh Frydenberg to stop the removal of cash

(legal tender) as planned by the Liberal Party. Scott Morrison is known as a ‘bankers man’ and he is spearheading the move to a cashless society. The the LNP/ALP duopoly in concert with the banks and the United Nations will be able to control your every move.

Get your friends to sign it and tell them what will happen if the duopoly gets this through parliament.

http://chng.it/FQh5jzFqJv

 

Age pensioners will be placed on the Indue cashless welfare card

Your grandma is next! Fight Morrison’s creeping cashless economy agenda

From the Australian Citizens Party

The Senate will soon vote on the Morrison government’s bill to extend the trials of the Indue cashless welfare card. These trials are part of the government’s and banks’ creeping cashless agenda, to force Australians into electronic payments and effectively trap them in banks. The government’s bill to ban cash transactions over $10,000 is part of the same agenda. While Australians angrily reacted in huge numbers to the $10,000 cash ban, which sparked an insurrection against the bill in the government’s own ranks, too many have failed to recognise the cashless welfare card is a foot in the door for the same agenda. If you oppose the push to a cashless economy, call cross-bench Senators Jacqui Lambie, Stirling Griff and Rex Patrick before Wednesday to demand they oppose the bill.

Totally compromised banker’s man and Prime Minister Scott Morrison is being controlled by the Deep State and is pushing Australia, as the NWO guinea pig, into a cashless society

Don’t fall for the justification that the Indue cashless welfare card ensures welfare recipients in highly disadvantaged communities spend their money responsibly and not on alcohol and cigarettes. The card is a totalitarian technological short-cut that is a substitute for addressing the real causes of welfare dependency and drug and alcohol abuse in disadvantaged communities. It is also a trial of a program that is intended to be rolled out Australia-wide, which will include recipients of the aged pension. The government falsely and insultingly calls the pension welfare when in fact it is a payment for which pensioners have contributed all their lives. The trials currently include recipients of disability and carers payments.

On 11 September 2019, the Citizens Party exposed how the Indue cashless welfare card is part of the broader push for a cashless economy:

The Morrison government’s cashless welfare card, and draft $10,000 cash ban bill, are part of the program to force Australians into a cashless economy system that will enable the private banking cartel and government to monitor and measure their words-the financial activities of every Australian.

In 2012 the RBA [Reserve Bank of Australia]-the high priests of the financial system who conjured Australia into a debt and real-estate bubble, and now use monetary policy solely to pump more debt into the bubble to prop up the banks-conducted a review of the payments system, using its legislated powers, unique among central banks, to promote efficiency and competition in the payments system. That review led to the establishment of the Australian Payments Council (APC), which was founded by the Australian Payments Clearing Association (APCA, now Australian Payments Network) to promote a strategic agenda for the Australian payments system through industry collaboration. The APC set out to create the platform for real time electronic payments clearing (including peer-to-peer consumers instantly paying each other through their phones), which is the infrastructure for a cashless economy. This idea became the New Payments Platform (NPP), and to coordinate the project and industry efforts to bring it to life, APCA engaged global accounting giant KPMG.

The NPP is now up and running, although in a fledgling state. It is jointly owned by 13 of the biggest financial institutions in Australia. Extraordinarily, the RBA itself is one of the owners-a massive conflict of interests for Australia’s central bank to effectively be in a business partnership with the private institutions it is supposed to regulate. Another curious name on the owners’ register is Indue, the private corporation that holds the contract to manage the government’s cashless welfare debit card, for which Indue is paid $10,000 per card to administer, and which the government wants to roll out Australia-wide.

While KPMG was coordinating the NPP, its former boss, Michael Andrew (now deceased)-the only Australian to ever become the worldwide boss of one of the Big Four global accounting firms-was chairing the government’s Black Economy Taskforce. In the Taskforce’s 2017 report, Andrew recommended the $10,000 cash ban to move people and businesses out of cash and into the banking system, which makes economic activity more visible, auditable and efficient.  In other words, to force Australians on to the NPP!

With the Indue card the government is picking off welfare recipients to be the first forced into their cashless regime, but your grandma is next. Meanwhile the banks are succeeding in using the pandemic disruption to advance their plans to reduce cash use and make people more reliant on electronic payment systems.

Here’s the good news: although it’s officially still in the Parliament as a bill, the government’s $10,000 cash ban has stalled. The government has gone very quiet on the issue, and that is entirely due to the huge public backlash they received after unveiling the bill last year. The Australian people fought them back, but must continue to do so every time the government tries to push the cashless agenda. This cashless welfare card bill is one of those times, so the Citizens Party is calling on concerned Australians to contact the three cross-bench Senators before Wednesday to insist they oppose this bill.

Senator Jacqui LambiePh: (03) 6431 3112Email: senator.lambie@aph.gov.au Senator Rex PatrickPh: (08) 8232 1144Email: senator.patrick@aph.gov.au Senator Stirling GriffPh: (08) 8212 1409Email: senator.griff@aph.gov.au

Wake up to a dose of Coronavirus reality. We have been scammed says prominent biologist

European nations such as Sweden and Denmark are “eradicating cash”

The cashless society is coming hard and fast. Even the US is preparing to remove cash transactions. The One World economy mentioned on ABC radio today is on track and you can bet the Goldman Sachs Merchant Bank-driven Malcolm Turnbull will be on board. By then it will be too late to stop the One World Government. Do you want this in Australia?

electronic-euro-1728x800_c-1024x474By Michael Snyder – Activist Post

Did you know that 95 percent of all retail sales in Sweden are cashless?  And did you know that the government of Denmark has a stated goal of “eradicating cash” by the year 2030?  All over the world, we are seeing a relentless march toward a cashless society, and nowhere is this more true than in northern Europe.  In Sweden, hundreds of bank branches no longer accept or dispense cash, and thousands of ATM machines have been permanently removed.

At this point, bills and coins only account for just 2 percent of the Swedish economy, and many stores no longer take cash at all.  The notion of a truly “cashless society” was once considered to be science fiction, but now we are being told that it is “inevitable”, and authorities insist that it will enable them to thwart criminals, terrorists, drug runners, money launderers and tax evaders.  But what will we give up in the process?

In Sweden, the transition to a cashless society is being enthusiastically embraced.  The following is an excerpt from a New York Times article that was published on Saturday…

Parishioners text tithes to their churches. Homeless street vendors carry mobile credit-card readers. Even the Abba Museum, despite being a shrine to the 1970s pop group that wrote “Money, Money, Money,” considers cash so last-century that it does not accept bills and coins.

Few places are tilting toward a cashless future as quickly as Sweden, which has become hooked on the convenience of paying by app and plastic.

To me, giving money in church electronically seems so bizarre.  But it is starting to happen here in the United States, and in Sweden some churches collect most of their tithes and offerings this way

During a recent Sunday service, the church’s bank account number was projected onto a large screen. Worshipers pulled out cellphones and tithed through an app called Swish, a payment system set up by Sweden’s biggest banks that is fast becoming a rival to cards.

Other congregants lined up at a special “Kollektomat” card machine, where they could transfer funds to various church operations. Last year, out of 20 million kronor in tithes collected, more than 85 percent came in by card or digital payment.

And of course it isn’t just Sweden that is rapidly transitioning to a cashless society.  Over in Denmark, government officials have a goal “to completely do away with paper money” by the year 2030

Sweden is not the only country interested in eradicating cash. Its neighbor, Denmark, is also making great strides to lessen the circulation of banknotes in the country.

Two decades ago, roughly 80 percent of Danish citizens relied on hard cash while shopping. Fast forward to today, that figure has dropped dramatically to 25 percent.

We’re interested in getting rid of cash,” said Matas IT Director Thomas Grane. “The handling, security and everything else is expensive; so, definitely we want to push digital payments, and that’s of course why we introduced mobile payments to help this process.”

Eventually, establishments may soon have the right to reject cash- a practice that is common in Sweden. Government officials have set a 2030 deadline to completely do away with paper money.

Could you imagine a world where you couldn’t use cash for anything?

This is the direction things are going – especially in Europe.

As I have written about previously, cash transactions of more than 2,500 euros have already been banned in Spain, and France and Italy have both banned all cash transactions of more than 1,000 euros.

Little by little, cash is being eradicated, and what we have seen so far is just the beginning.  417 billion cashless transactions were conducted in 2014, and the final number for 2015 is projected to be much higher.

Banks like this change, because it enables them to make more money due to the fees that they collect from credit cards and debit cards.  And governments like this change because electronic payments enable them to watch, track and monitor what we are all doing much more easily.

These days, very rarely does anyone object to what is happening.  Instead, most of us just seem to accept that this change is “inevitable”, and we are being assured that it will be for the better.  And no matter where in the world you go, the propaganda seems to be the same.  For example, the following comes from an Australian news source

AND so we prepare to turn the page to fresh year — 2016, a watershed year in which Australia will accelerate towards becoming a genuine cashless society.

The cashless society will be a new world free of $1 and $2 coins, or $5 or $10 bank notes. A new world in which all commercial transactions, from buying an i-pad or a hamburger to playing the poker machines, purchasing a newspaper, paying household bills or picking up the dry-cleaning, will be paid for electronically.

And in that same article the readers are told that Australia will likely be “a fully cashless society” by 2022…

Research by Westpac Bank predicts Australia will be a fully cashless society by 2022 — just six years away. Already half of all commercial payments are now made electronically.

Even in some of the poorest areas on the entire globe we are seeing a move toward a cashless society.  In 2015, banks in India made major progress on this front, and income tax rebates are being considered by the government as an incentive “to encourage people to move away from cash transactions”.

Would a truly cashless society reduce crime and make all of our lives much more efficient?

Maybe.

But what would we have to give up?

To me, America is supposed to be a place where we can go where we want and do what we want without the government constantly monitoring us.  If people choose to use cashless forms of payment that is one thing, but if we are all required to go to such a system I fear that it could result in the loss of tremendous amounts of freedom and liberty.

And it is all too easy to imagine a world where a government-sponsored form of “identification” would be required to use any form of electronic payment.  This would give the government complete control over who could use “the system” and who could not.  The potential for various forms of coercion and tyranny in such a scenario is obvious.

What would you do if you could not buy, sell, get a job or open a bank account without proper “identification” someday?  What you simply give in to whatever the government was demanding of you at the time even if it went against your fundamental beliefs?

That is certainly something to think about.

Many will cheer as the world makes a rapid transition to a cashless society, but I will not.  I believe that a truly cashless system would open the door for great evil, and I don’t want any part of it.

What about you?

Would you welcome a cashless society?

Total economic collapse is real in 2016

Financial experts predict there is much worse to come. They say get prepared!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPY9li_CMXs

The banks and governments are now trying to devise a foolproof system for street people and the unemployed to allow them access to social security payments while living on the streets. The cashless economy is on the way. A recent example of the consequences for an electronically controlled society hit home at the far northern Queensland mining town of Weipa. A green initiative of Rio Tinto is to supplement the town’s diesel-driven power generator by switching over to electricity from a large solar installation the company constructed earlier this year.

When making the switchover the solar system failed and the normal power supply shut down. Woolworths, the only food outlet at Weipa, was forced to close its doors for nearly two hours. People already in the shop were asked to leave and the doors were shut behind them. The cash registers and barcode readers could not function, the refrigeration stopped working, the lights and air conditioning failed. This is how the governments of the future will control a cashless society. When the citizens object to more and more fascist policies of the ALP and LNP, the ‘government’ will force Woolworths, Coles and the banks to drop their security shutters’, turn off the power and without cash to buy produce direct from farmers, people will starve.

If the power is turned off across the city, no EFTPOS machines can work. No cash, no food!

http://mfisolutions.com/sense.php> http://mfisolutions.com/sense.php