Daily Archives: May 28, 2020

Labor doubles the value per vote for political parties from $3 to $6

Letter to the Editor

There is a full page advertisement in some newspapers from the Liberal Party asking for candidates to contest the state seats of Cook and Hill.(west of Cairns)

It never ceases to amaze me when we keep getting Labor candidates re-elected in Cook.  At least five conservative political parties I have discovered are going to put their hands up to run against Cynthia Lui the indigenous Labor member on October 31.

Not all of them can be serious about winning the seat. There is a large welfare vote in the northern part of Cook which favours the sitting member.

But conservative voters outnumber the Labor voters. If the LNP, KAP, One Nation, Palmer and NQ First all nominate candidates they split the vote five ways and Labor gets returned.

I have my suspicions that most of these parties know they can’t win and are just chasing the money. Why not when the Labor Government recently doubled the value of your vote to candidates and parties which get over 4 per cent of the tally?

Payments to candidates standing for election will increase from $1.57 per vote received to $3.

Payments to political parties will also increase, from $3.14 to $6 per vote received.

The eligibility threshold for the payments has also changed — parties and candidates will only require 4 per cent of the primary vote, rather than 6 per cent, to receive the money.

It would be a good question to ask. Where does the money come from?

It is up to voters to determine which candidate is serious about winning and working for the local community instead of chasing the money. My test is who is a local and will live in the seat, how many MP’s do they have in the nearby region and their past performance and who champions regional communities, farmers and small businesses of the Far North?

It is not hard to find an answer.

Yours

K Court

Cairns

Editor: Cairnsnews editorial board has agreed to publish letters from North Queensland readers relating to the upcoming state election. Particularly like this one which the writer said Newscorp and other press would not publish. Send in your unpublished letter and we will print it if it has merit. We will publish the identity of the newspapers that refuse to publish well written letters with topical subjects.

Rupert Murdoch digitises most regional papers or shuts them down

Regional Queenslanders and nearly all other districts across the nation are about to lose their local rag. Something as fundamental as a local newspaper which a reader can pick up from the newsagent  is a part of Australian culture. Regional Australia can place the blame fairly and squarely on the LNP/ALP duopoly for allowing such a concentration of media in the hands of one media monolith. Murdoch took the abundant advertising cream from these tabloids for two to three decades after buying most independent newspapers from family owned businesses across Australia.

Murdoch editorials and general news stories have always favoured the LNP first, then the ALP and bugger everybody else. This is how Murdoch was allowed to have such a disproportionate concentration of media ownership which includes nearly all major city dailies and The Australian. Billions of dollars revenue from government advertising and the grocery duopoly also played a big part in the editorial flavour of News Ltd publications.

The opportunity now presents itself for new players to enter the print media market but there is one snag. Murdoch still controls most of the tabloid printing presses in Queensland and the price of printing a local paper might keep new publications from filling the void.

Banjo Peterson will roll over in his grave.

from the ABC

Queensland

Newspaper Editions
Cairns Post Print and Digital
Townsville Bulletin Print and Digital
Gold Coast Bulletin Print and Digital
Toowoomba Chronicle Print and Digital
Mackay Daily Mercury Digital only
Rockhampton Morning Bulletin Digital only
Gladstone Observer Digital only
Bundaberg News Mail Digital only
Fraser Coast Chronicle Digital only
Gympie Times Digital only
Sunshine Coast Daily Digital only
Queensland Times Digital only
Warwick Daily News Digital only
Central and North Burnett Times Digital only
Central Queensland News Digital only
Chinchilla News Digital only
Dalby Herald Digital only
Gatton Star Digital only
Noosa News Digital only
South Burnett Times Digital only
Stanthorpe Border Post Digital only
Western Star Digital only
Western Times Digital only
Whitsunday Times Digital only
Whitsunday Coast Guardian Digital only
Bowen Independent Digital only
Albert and Logan News Digital only
Caboolture Herald Digital only
Westside News Digital only
Pine Rivers Press Digital only
Redcliffe and Bayside Herald Digital only
South-West News Digital only
Wynnum Herald Digital only
North Lakes Times Digital only
Redlands Community News Digital only
Springfield News Digital only
Northside Chronicle/Bayside Star Ceasing publication
North-West News Ceasing publication
South-East Advertiser Ceasing publication
Southern Star Ceasing publication
Bribie Weekly Ceasing publication
Buderim Chronicle Ceasing publication
Caloundra Weekly Ceasing publication
Capricorn Coast Mirror Ceasing publication
Coolum News Ceasing publication
Nambour Weekly Ceasing publication
Ipswich Advertiser Ceasing publication
Kawana/Maroochy Weekly Ceasing publication
Gold Coast Sun Ceasing publication
Hervey Bay Independent Ceasing publication
Maryborough Herald Ceasing publication
Balonne Beacon Ceasing publication
Surat Basin News Ceasing publication
Herbert River Express Ceasing publication
Innisfail Advocate Ceasing publication
Central Telegraph Ceasing publication
The Atherton Tablelander Will continue to appear in regional sections of the Cairns Post and Townsville Bulletin
Northern Miner Will continue to appear in regional sections of the Cairns Post and Townsville Bulletin
Port Douglas & Mossman Gazette Will continue to appear in regional sections of the Cairns Post and Townsville Bulletin
Burdekin Advocate Will continue to appear in regional sections of the Cairns Post and Townsville Bulletin

Mandatory vaccinations, biometric identification and digital payments coming soon to Australia

by Alexandra Bruce

“But time is not on our side. Even as we speak, mass vaccination campaigns are being prepared. Biometric identification schemes and “immunity passports” are already being rolled-out. Programs for tracking tracing and surveilling the entire population are already being beta-tested and the digital payment infrastructure; the system of financial exclusion that will allow governments to turn off our access to the economy at will is being put into place….”

As we have seen in our exploration of Gates’s rise as unelected global health czar and population control advocate, the question of who Bill Gates really is is no mere philosophical pursuit. Given that we are currently living through a crisis that has been predicted by Bill Gates, which is triggering a response from the global health organizations that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has bankrolled and driving us toward a vaccination and biometric ID solution, which Bill Gates has been working on for years, the answer to the question, “Who is Bill Gates?” is quickly becoming one of the most important questions of our lives.

 That answer will not only tell us about the world that we are living in but about the one that we are being thrust into and how we can avoid it. Today, we will attempt to answer that question, as we examine the motives, the ideology and the connections of this man who has been so instrumental in shaping the post-coronavirus world…

 So, who is Bill Gates? Some argue that he’s a genius who leveraged his natural computer-savvy into a billion dollar fortune. Others insist that he is a visionary who has changed our lives with his foresight and bold imagination. He has been hailed as a shrewd executive who built the Microsoft empire with his remarkable talent for business and he has been praised as a philanthropist who is selflessly devoting his wealth to improving the lives of people around the world but like anyone of his status, he has his detractors…

 In the 1990s, he was often portrayed as the greedy head of the evil Microsoft monopoly but in the age of the coronavirus crisis he is most often treated like some sort of epidemiologist or leading health researcher. But in truth, none of these perspectives are accurate…

 As Gates admits, it is not a spirit of selfless generosity that motivates his interest in vaccines and other lucrative health interventions. He tells one reporter, seen here that his foundation has received $100 billion overall “and there’s been over a 20-to-1 return. So, if you just look at the economic benefits that’s a pretty strong number compared to anything else.”

 Gates’ philanthropic investment scheme has paid off well, with his $50 billion dollar net worth having ballooned to over $100 billion after his decade of altruism in the vaccine market.

 As critics of his foundation have repeatedly pointed out, the nine million people who die every year of hunger would be best served by securing food supplies, running water and other basic necessities – not costly medical interventions for rare diseases. But there is no return on investment to be made from that kind of charity.

 No, this is not about charity. It is about control. The population control grid that Gates has been quietly funding into existence for the past decade; a biometric identification system tied to a digital payments infrastructure that will be used to track, catalogue and control every movement, every transaction and every interaction of every citizen is just now coming into view but the real question is, why is he doing this?

 What drives a man like Bill Gates, a man rich beyond the wildest dreams of avarice to spend his time and invest his fortune in schemes to control the population? To find the answer to that question we have to examine Gates’ family background.

 Bill Gates, it should not be surprising to learn was born into money. His great-grandfather, JW Maxwell was the President of National City Bank in Seattle. His grandfather, Willard was also a banker and his grandmother, Adele a prominent Seattle civic leader.

 Bill Gates’ mother Mary Maxwell Gates was a scion of the Maxwell banking family and by all accounts, as hard-driving as her forebears. She served as a director of several companies including First Interstate Bank Corp and KIROTV of Seattle. She served as a regent at the University of Washington and she was appointed to the board of the United Way of America where, as we have seen, she persuaded IBM CEO, John Opel to help her son in his fledgling software development career.

 Bill’s father William H Gates Sr was a prominent Seattle area lawyer. He co-founded a powerful law and lobbying firm, helped Howard Schultz in his bid to buy Starbucks, served on the boards of numerous companies and organizations and along the way, had a profound influence on his son’s life and career.

 Bill Gates learned much from his parents. From his mother’s banking family, he inherited a “nose for the dollar,” as one childhood friend’s father called it. From his hard-driving legal minded father, he learned the value of legalizing business arrangements. As a child, he even had a legal contract drawn up to grant him the use of his older sister’s baseball mitt…

 A “nose for the dollar” and a knowledge of how to use the legal system to get what you want were not the only things to emerge from Bill Gates’ childhood, however. His parents also encouraged discussion about the family’s charity work and the causes they held close to their heart. As Gates revealed to Bill Moyers in 2003, those causes included the population issue, which sparked a lifelong interest in reproductive health…

 Gates tips his hand when he equates “issues related to population” with “reproductive health”. The topic is particularly controversial, because “population control” and “reproductive health” have been used for half a century as a euphemism for eugenics, the discredited pseudoscience that holds that certain families are fit to be leaders of society by virtue of their superior genes…

 As transparent as it seems to us today, that this ideology was a self-serving, self-justification for the ruling class, it was quickly taken up as the great social crusade of the early 20th century. From Teddy Roosevelt to HG Wells to Julian Huxley to Winston Churchill, there was widespread support for the eugenicist notion that society must strive to make sure that the rich and well-born breed as much as possible and the poor infirm and feeble-minded be prevented from having children…

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